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If you are looking for ways to improve your productivity and workflows, by harnessing the power of artificial intelligence within the OpenAI ChatGPT chatbot You will be pleased to know there are plenty of automated solutions you can set up to help you with those daily mundane tasks that seem to eat away at your precious time.

Whether you’re managing a small team, running a large enterprise, or simply looking to streamline your personal projects, connections between ChatGPT and your daily software and applications are easy to set up and require no coding at all. In this guide, we provide a wealth of information and inspiration on how you can harness the capabilities of ChatGPT and combine them with no code systems such as Zapier  or Make to name just a few. Once learnt the simple automations  can transform your approach to work and personal productivity.

In the following sections, we’ll explore a versatile range of ChatGPT integrations offered by Make that promise to enhance your efficiency. From automating routine email responses to conducting in-depth sentiment analysis on customer feedback, these tools cater to a wide spectrum of needs. You will learn how to use ChatGPT for generating SEO-friendly content, translating messages in multiple languages, and even repurposing social media content across different platforms.

Additionally, we will investigate more advanced automation workflows such as transcribing audio files and categorizing support tickets based on agent expertise. Each automation is designed to not only save you time but also to ensure accuracy and creativity in your outputs. By the end of this article, you will have a comprehensive understanding of how to leverage these 27 ChatGPT automations to streamline both your professional and personal workflows.

Automate your work using AI

AI Andy has created a fantastic overview of how you can use the Make online automation service to carry out a wealth of automation improving your productivity and removing those annoying tedious tasks from your daily workflow.

  1. SEO Keyword Generation:
    • Function: This automation utilizes ChatGPT to generate SEO keywords whenever new rows are added to Google Sheets.
    • Application: Ideal for content creators and digital marketers, this tool simplifies the process of identifying relevant keywords for articles, blogs, and web content. By automating this step, it significantly reduces the time and effort spent on keyword research, allowing for a more streamlined content strategy.
    • Benefit: Ensures that your content is optimized for search engines, potentially increasing visibility and audience reach.
  2. Email Response Automation:
    • Function: ChatGPT, when integrated with Google Sheets, can automatically respond to business emails.
    • Application: This is particularly valuable for handling repetitive queries like sponsorship or partnership inquiries. It can be customized to respond based on specific triggers or keywords found in the emails.
    • Benefit: This automation saves time, reduces the workload on your team, and ensures timely responses to important emails, enhancing business communication efficiency.
  3. Customer Feedback Sentiment Analysis:
    • Function: ChatGPT can analyze the sentiment of customer feedback inputted into Google Sheets.
    • Application: This is a powerful tool for recruiters, surveyors, and data analysts, who can use it to gauge customer satisfaction, employee feedback, or market research responses.
    • Benefit: Provides valuable insights into customer opinions and experiences, helping businesses make informed decisions and improve customer satisfaction.
  4. Airtable for Advanced Automations:
    • Function: Similar to Google Sheets, Airtable rows can trigger ChatGPT to create new outputs.
    • Application: This can be used for a variety of tasks, such as content generation, data organization, and project management.
    • Benefit: Airtable’s versatile database structure coupled with ChatGPT’s language processing capabilities makes for powerful, customized automations across different business functions.
  5. Sales Analysis for Online Businesses:
    • Function: Businesses using e-commerce platforms like WooCommerce or Shopify can automate their sales analysis reports with OpenAI integration.
    • Application: This automation can compile sales data, analyze trends, and generate comprehensive reports.
    • Benefit: It provides businesses with detailed insights into their sales performance, helping them make data-driven decisions to boost sales and optimize their marketing strategies.
  6. Automated Slack Status Updates:
    • Function: Create new Slack statuses based on specified topics using OpenAI.
    • Application: This is particularly useful in remote or hybrid work setups, where team members can update their status to reflect their current tasks or availability automatically.
    • Benefit: Enhances communication and coordination within remote teams, ensuring everyone is aware of each other’s focus areas or availability.

Other articles we have written that you may find of interest on the  subject of ChatGPT automation  and workflow optimization :

ChatGPT automations

  1. Language Translation for Telegram Bot:
    • Function: This feature allows for the translation of Telegram bot messages into multiple languages using ChatGPT.
    • Application: It’s particularly useful for businesses and individuals who communicate with a global audience. Whether it’s customer support, information dissemination, or casual conversations, this tool breaks the language barrier.
    • Benefit: Enhances global communication and engagement, ensuring messages reach a broader audience in their preferred language.
  2. Interactive Telegram Bot Responses:
    • Function: ChatGPT enables the Telegram bot to provide automated responses to direct questions asked in the app.
    • Application: This can be used for a variety of purposes such as customer service, information queries, or interactive engagements.
    • Benefit: Speeds up information access and improves user interaction, offering real-time, accurate responses to queries.
  3. Social Media Content Generation:
    • Function: Automatically converts published articles into social media posts.
    • Application: Ideal for content marketers and social media managers, this tool helps in repurposing blog posts or articles for platforms like Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn.
    • Benefit: Saves time in content creation and ensures consistent online presence, expanding the reach of existing content.
  4. Google Drive Audio File Transcription:
    • Function: Utilizes OpenAI Whisper to transcribe audio files from Google Drive, with the option to send summaries via email.
    • Application: Perfect for businesses and teams that record meetings, interviews, or lectures and need them transcribed for record-keeping or follow-ups.
    • Benefit: Streamlines the process of converting spoken words to text, facilitating easy access and review of audio content.
  5. LinkedIn Content from TikTok Videos:
    • Function: ChatGPT assists in repurposing TikTok video content for LinkedIn posts.
    • Application: Useful for content creators and marketers aiming to leverage their TikTok content in a professional context on LinkedIn.
    • Benefit: Maximizes the utility of video content across different platforms, enhancing social media presence and engagement.
  6. Zoom Meeting Summaries:
    • Function: Transcribe and summarize Zoom meeting recordings efficiently.
    • Application: Beneficial for businesses and educational institutions to keep records of meetings, lectures, or discussions.
    • Benefit: Ensures important details and decisions from meetings are captured and made easily accessible for future reference.
  7. E-commerce Product Description Creation:
    • Function: Generates high-converting product descriptions for e-commerce platforms like WooCommerce and Shopify.
    • Application: This is a boon for e-commerce businesses looking to enhance their product listings with compelling descriptions.
    • Benefit: Improves SEO and the potential for organic traffic, leading to better conversion rates and sales.
  8. Support Ticket Categorization:
    • Function: ChatGPT helps in categorizing support tickets and matching them with the most suitable customer service agents based on their expertise.
    • Application: This is particularly beneficial for customer support teams in managing a large volume of inquiries and ensuring that each ticket is addressed by the right agent.
    • Benefit: Enhances the efficiency of customer service, leading to quicker resolution times and improved customer satisfaction.

 

  1. Direct Social Media Posting from Blogs:
    • Function: This feature enables direct posting of content on social media platforms from blog articles using ChatGPT.
    • Application: It’s useful for bloggers, content creators, and digital marketers looking to maximize their online presence without additional effort in content creation for social media.
    • Benefit: Saves time and ensures a consistent and broadened digital footprint, increasing audience engagement.
  2. Automated Competitor Analysis:
    • Function: Analyse competitor strategies from Gong calls and store the insights in Airtable.
    • Application: Sales and marketing teams can use this feature to stay informed about competitors’ tactics and strategies.
    • Benefit: Provides valuable intelligence for refining sales approaches and marketing strategies, keeping businesses competitive.
  3. Follow-up Question Responses:
    • Function: OpenAI GPT-3 offers the capability to provide quick and accurate responses to follow-up questions.
    • Application: Ideal for customer service, help desks, and interactive platforms where prompt responses are crucial.
    • Benefit: Enhances customer service efficiency, ensuring that users receive timely and relevant information.
  4. Custom Messaging Workflows:
    • Function: Personalize messaging workflows using OpenAI’s ‘write me’ feature based on specific prompts.
    • Application: This can be used by businesses for customized marketing messages, personalized emails, or unique content creation.
    • Benefit: Allows for greater flexibility and creativity in communications, tailored to specific audiences or purposes.
  5. Meeting Summaries with Audio Files:
    • Function: Generate concise audio summaries of meetings, making them accessible for reference and team updates.
    • Application: Useful for corporate teams, project groups, and educational settings where meeting recaps are essential.
    • Benefit: Saves time in revisiting meeting content and ensures key points and decisions are effectively communicated.
  6. Product Satisfaction Survey Analysis:
    • Function: Perform sentiment analysis on product satisfaction surveys to gauge customer opinions and experiences.
    • Application: Essential for businesses seeking to understand customer feedback in depth and improve their products or services.
    • Benefit: Offers valuable insights into customer satisfaction, aiding in product development and customer relationship management.

Make online automation service

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  1. Efficient Audio Notifications:
    • Function: Utilize Eden AI to send audio files generated by ChatGPT in Telegram for effective audio notifications.
    • Application: Can be used for reminders, updates, or alerts in a more engaging and accessible format than traditional text notifications.
    • Benefit: Enhances the effectiveness of communication, particularly in scenarios where quick information dissemination is critical.
  2. Sales Insights from Gong Call Summaries:
    • Function: Summarize Gong calls using OpenAI for in-depth sales insights and strategy development.
    • Application: Sales teams can use this feature to analyse call recordings for understanding customer interactions, objections, and responses.
    • Benefit: Provides a concise overview of sales calls, helping in identifying successful tactics and areas for improvement.
  3. Workflow Customization with Airtable:
    • Function: Similar to Google Sheets, this integration allows for automating responses and data analysis with Airtable.
    • Application: Suitable for a variety of business processes including project management, CRM updates, and content planning.
    • Benefit: Offers a more flexible and robust system for managing complex workflows, enhancing productivity and data organization.
  4. Blog Content Repurposing Across Platforms:
    • Function: ChatGPT aids in adapting blog content for use across multiple social media platforms.
    • Application: Content creators and digital marketers can extend the reach of their blog posts by converting them into format-specific content for platforms like Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.
    • Benefit: Maximizes the value of existing content, ensuring wider dissemination and engagement without additional content creation efforts.
  5. Streamlined Customer Service:
    • Function: Automate the allocation of support tickets to customer service agents based on their expertise.
    • Application: Ideal for customer support centres dealing with a range of inquiries requiring different levels of expertise.
    • Benefit: Ensures that customer queries are handled by the most qualified agents, improving resolution time and customer satisfaction.
  6. Multilingual Telegram Bot Interactions:
    • Function: Automatically translate Telegram bot messages into various languages.
    • Application: Useful for businesses and communities that interact with a diverse, global audience.
    • Benefit: Breaks down language barriers, enabling more inclusive and effective communication with international users.
  7. Creative Content Generation:
    • Function: ChatGPT is used to generate a variety of creative content, from social media posts to complete blog articles.
    • Application: Valuable for marketers, bloggers, and content creators who need regular, high-quality content.
    • Benefit: Streamlines the content creation process, providing fresh, engaging, and tailored content while saving time and resources.
  8. Automated Social Media Analytics:
    • Function: ChatGPT can analyse social media metrics and generate comprehensive reports.
    • Application: Ideal for social media managers and marketers who need to track the performance of their campaigns across various platforms.
    • Benefit: Provides detailed insights into engagement rates, audience growth, and content performance, enabling more informed social media strategies.
  9. Project Management Optimization:
    • Function: Utilize ChatGPT to streamline project management tasks such as updating project statuses, generating progress reports, and automating task assignments.
    • Application: Useful for project managers and teams in both small-scale and large-scale projects.
    • Benefit: Improves project tracking and team coordination, ensuring timely completion of tasks and efficient resource allocation.
  10. Automated Market Research Summaries:
    • Function: ChatGPT can summarize extensive market research data and provide key insights.
    • Application: Valuable for businesses and market analysts looking to quickly understand market trends, consumer behaviour, and industry changes.
    • Benefit: Offers a swift and comprehensive overview of complex market data, aiding in strategic decision-making and business planning.

The world of automation, especially with tools like ChatGPT, opens up a realm of possibilities for enhancing productivity and streamlining workflows. By automating repetitive tasks, from managing emails and social media posts to analysing complex data, you free up valuable time and resources. This allows you and your team to focus on more creative and strategic endeavours.

The key advantage of these automations lies in their ability to handle a wide array of tasks efficiently and accurately. Whether it’s generating content, summarizing meetings, or analysing customer feedback, these tools not only save time but also bring a level of consistency and precision that is hard to achieve manually. In essence, embracing these automation solutions can lead to a more organized, efficient, and productive work environment, ultimately driving success and growth in your personal and professional life.

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Sourced from Geek Gadget

By David Nield

Generate your own text—but get help from the AI bot to make it stand out.

It’s been quite a year for ChatGPT, with the large language model (LLM) now taking exams, churning out content, searching the web, writing code, and more. The AI chatbot can produce its own stories, though whether they’re any good is another matter.

If you’re in any way involved in the business of writing, then tools like ChatGPT have the potential to complete up-end the way you work—but at this stage, it’s not inevitable that journalists, authors, and copywriters will be replaced by generative AI bots.

What we can say with certainty is that ChatGPT is a reliable writing assistant, provided you use it in the right way. If you have to put words in order as part of your job, here’s how ChatGPT might be able to take your writing to the next level—at least until it replaces you, anyway.

Find the Right Word

Using a thesaurus as a writer isn’t particularly frowned on; using ChatGPT to come up with the right word or phrase shouldn’t be either. You can use the bot to look for variations on a particular word, or get even more specific and say you want alternatives that are less or more formal, longer or shorter, and so on.

Where ChatGPT really comes in handy is when you’re reaching for a word and you’re not even sure it exists: Ask about “a word that means a sense of melancholy but in particular one that comes and goes and doesn’t seem to have a single cause” and you’ll get back “ennui” as a suggestion (or at least we did).

If you have characters talking, you might even ask about words or phrases that would typically be said by someone from a particular region, of a particular age, or with particular character traits. This being ChatGPT, you can always ask for more suggestions.

Screenshot of ChatGPT in a browser window

ChatGPT is never short of ideas. OpenAI via David Nield

Find Inspiration

Whatever you might think about the quality and character of ChatGPT’s prose, it’s hard to deny that it’s quite good at coming up with ideas. If your powers of imagination have hit a wall then you can turn to ChatGPT for some inspiration about plot points, character motivations, the settings of scenes, and so on.

This can be anything from the broad to the detailed. Maybe you need ideas about what to write a novel or an article about—where it’s set, what the context is, and what the theme is. If you’re a short story writer, perhaps you could challenge yourself to write five tales inspired by ideas from ChatGPT.

Alternatively, you might need inspiration for something very precise, whether that’s what happens next in a scene or how to summarize an essay. At whatever point in the process you get writer’s block, then ChatGPT might be one way of working through it.

Do Research

Writing is often about a lot more than putting words down in order. You’ll regularly have to look up facts, figures, trends, history, and more to make sure that everything is accurate (unless your next literary work is entirely inside a fantasy world that you’re imagining yourself).

ChatGPT can sometimes have the edge over conventional search engines when it comes to knowing what food people might have eaten in a certain year in a certain part of the world, or what the procedure is for a particular type of crime. Whereas Google might give you SEO-packed spam sites with conflicting answers, ChatGPT will actually return something coherent.

That said, we know that LLMs have a tendency to “hallucinate” and present inaccurate information—so you should always double-check what ChatGPT tells you with a second source to make sure you’re not getting something wildly wrong.

Choose Character and Place Names

Getting fictional character and place names right can be a challenge, especially when they’re important to the plot. A name has to have the right vibe and the right connotations, and if you get it wrong it really sticks out on the page.

ChatGPT can come up with an unlimited number of names for people and places in your next work of fiction, and it can be a lot of fun playing around with this too. The more detail you give about a person or a place, the better—maybe you want a name that really reflects a character trait for example, or a geographical feature.

The elements of human creation and curation aren’t really replaced, because you’re still weighing up which names work and which don’t, and picking the right one—but getting ChatGPT on the job can save you a lot of brainstorming time.

Screenshot of ChatGPT in a browser window

Get your names right with ChatGPT. OpenAI via David Nield

Review Your Work

With a bit of cutting and pasting, you can quickly get ChatGPT to review your writing as well: It’ll attempt to tell you if there’s anything that doesn’t make sense, if your sentences are too long, or if your prose is too lengthy.

From spotting spelling and grammar mistakes to recognizing a tone that’s too formal, ChatGPT has plenty to offer as an editor and critic. Just remember that this is an LLM, after all, and it doesn’t actually “know” anything—try to keep a reasonable balance between accepting ChatGPT’s suggestions and giving it too much control.

If you’re sharing your work with ChatGPT, you can also ask it for better ways to phrase something, or suggestions on how to change the tone—though this gets into the area of having the bot actually do your writing for you, which all genuine writers would want to avoid.

Feature Image Credit: PM Images /Getty Images

By David Nield

David Nield is a tech journalist from Manchester in the UK, who has been writing about apps and gadgets for more than two decades. You can follow him on Twitter.

Sourced from WIRED

By

Many tech and finance experts are talking about ChatGPT and how it is revolutionizing content creation. But can you actually use ChatGPT, or another AI tool, to make money on social media? You can, in fact, and here’s what you need to know about using ChatGPT to make money on Twitter (now X).

Sponsored Tweets

If you have a large enough following, companies will pay you to tweet about their products. To make money in this way, it’s helpful to have not only a large following, but one that is specific to a type of product. For example, if you tweet about parenting young children, you may be able to post sponsored tweets about baby products or toys.

Most companies use an agency to find influencers to post sponsored tweets about their products. The agency gets a cut of the money, but it’s a lot more efficient than trying to find companies on your own. Try SponsoredTweets.com or Collective Voice, or just Google “social media influencer agency.” You can sign up with more than one agency, which will increase your chances of getting selected by a brand to post sponsored tweets.

To use ChatGPT to create your sponsored tweets, the first thing you need to do is to verify that you can do this. There should be a stipulation in the influencer contract that indicates whether the company allows AI-generated content. If it’s not mentioned in the contract, ask. It’s not worth saving a few minutes of time by having AI generate your content if it means you get fired from a lucrative contract.

Once you’ve determined that the brand will accept AI-generated content, all you need to do is write a prompt asking for copy that talks about the product in your voice. You can include word or character counts if that’s a requirement for the sponsored tweet. Check the tweet to make sure that it’s accurate and you like it, and you’re good to go.

Affiliate Marketing

Companies use affiliate marketing to broaden their reach so they can get their message out to more consumers. If you have a lot of followers on Twitter (now X) you can sell other company’s products by promoting them on your feed. For every order the company gets through your tweets, they’ll pay you.

This arrangement requires that you choose a product or products to sell on Twitter, and every time a sale is made through one of your posts, you get a commission. To find products to sell, sign up for an affiliate marketplace like JVZoo or ClickBank. Then you can browse the available products and choose which one(s) you want to promote.

You can then use ChatGPT or another AI tool to create your posts. As with anything that you’re doing with AI, the key is to compose the prompt correctly. You want to be sure that your post sounds natural — like it’s actually coming from you — and that it represents the product accurately. You may have to try a few times to get it right.

Blogging

Successful bloggers know that it’s all about the volume of content — the more you can post, the more money you can earn. But writing all those posts yourself takes time. You can use ChatGPT to create blog posts much more quickly than you could write them yourself. You can ask ChatGPT to create a blog post and you can even ask for the post to be in your style or voice.

As a hypothetical example: If Chris Smith has a blog called “Cooking with Chris,” Smith could prompt ChatGPT to “write a blog post with instructions on how to bake sugar cookies from scratch in the style of Chris Smith of Cooking with Chris.” Plugins such as VoxScript allow ChatGPT to browse the internet to familiarize the model with Chris’ previous work, or several blogs can be fed to the AI manually to form a basis. Then, all Chris needs to do is verify that the recipe is accurate (trying it would be a good idea) and then post it.

E-Books

ChatGPT can help with writing e-books as well. When using AI to generate an e-book, it’s best to start with an outline. Determine the number of chapters or sections you want your e-book to have, and what each chapter or section should cover. You can write a detailed prompt for the entire e-book at once or break it up and do one section or chapter at a time. It is likely, due to current constraints, that several pieces will have be done separately and then assembled later down the line.

Be sure to review the copy carefully to make sure it flows properly and isn’t redundant, particularly if you’re using different prompts for each section. Once the copy is generated, you can write another prompt for an introduction and conclusion.

Promoting your e-book on Twitter requires that you have a following, of course, and that you are recognized as an authority in the subject you’re writing about. If that’s the case, you can use ChatGPT to write a post advertising your e-book and start selling!

All of these ways to make money on Twitter with ChatGPT come with the same caveat: any artificial intelligence tool is a data gathering tool. It’s up to you, as the owner of the Twitter account, to ensure that the content you are posting is accurate and doesn’t violate any of Twitter’s rules. Most importantly, it has to be content that you stand behind. Checking the sources is imperative, because you can lose your hard-earned credibility quickly by posting something without verifying the validity of information

feature image credit: Vertigo3d / Getty Images

By

Sourced from GOBankingRates

Is Elon laughing? Reports say Mark Zuckerberg’s ‘Twitter-killer’ just suffered a stunning 50% collapse in daily active users after white-hot start — but here’s why Musk should still worry

Threads seems to be unravelling — for now.

After a record-breaking launch, Mark Zuckerberg’s new app Threads has seen the numbers wane — significantly. Threads attracted over 100 million users within five days of its launch, demolishing ChatGPT’s record of fastest-growing consumer app and earning it the nickname “Twitter killer.”

However, recent data from industry sources suggest many of these users haven’t stayed active on the platform since the white-hot launch.

Engagement settles lower

Active users on the new app declined by 50% from 49 million on July 7th to 23.6 million on July 14th, according to a new report by SimilarWeb. That means only a quarter of the platform comes back to check and interact on the app every day. Even Mark Zuckerberg admitted that the number of people returning to the app is in the “tens of millions.”

This means that the so-called “Twitter killer” still has plenty of work ahead of itself. Twitter is a private company that doesn’t release these numbers publicly, but the latest figures from the company’s last earnings report suggest the daily active user base stood at roughly 238 million. According to Elon Musk, that number has surged to 259.4 million recently.

Effectively, Threads has only 10% of the daily active users of its biggest rival. However, that doesn’t necessarily mean Musk will get the last laugh.

Why Twitter should be worried

There is evidence to suggest that rivals like Threads are seeping users and engagement from the legacy social app. Web traffic to Twitter was down 5% within the first two days of Threads being launched, according to data from SimilarWeb. Although this has recovered a little since then, traffic is still 11% lower year-over-year.

The fact that a rival app captured 10% of the user base within weeks should also be a concern. Zuckerberg has a track record of successfully scaling social media platforms — Facebook, Instagram, and Whatsapp each boasts billions of daily active users.

Elon Musk recently admitted that Twitter’s revenue had dropped 50% while the company was cash flow negative due to a “heavy debt load.” Musk’s decision to scale back content moderation may have scared off advertisers, according to a Bloomberg report. Researchers have seen a significant uptick in hate speech and violent content on the site in recent months.

Billionaire entrepreneur Mark Cuban mocked Musk on Twitter by saying “Go red, no bread,” while retweeting Musk’s announcement about revenue declines.

Cuban has been a vocal critic of Musk’s policies ever since he took over the social media brand last year.

“Who he supports or denigrates is the Twitter equivalent of State intervention. He owns the platform, he can do what he chooses,” he said in a tweet earlier this year. “But it’s disingenuous to say Twitter is the home of free speech when he chooses to often put his thumb on the scale of reach.”

Cuban is an active user of both Threads and Twitter

Feature Image Credit: Frederic Legrand – COMEO/Shutterstock

By Vishesh Raisinghani

Vishesh Raisinghani is a freelance contributor at MoneyWise. He has been writing about financial markets and economics since 2014 – having covered family offices, private equity, real estate, cryptocurrencies, and tech stocks over that period. His work has appeared in Seeking Alpha, Motley Fool Canada, Motley Fool UK, Mergers & Acquisitions, National Post, Financial Post, and Yahoo Canada.

Sourced from moneywise

By Chad S. White

Brands have two major levers they can pull to protect themselves from the negative effects of growing use of generative AI.

The Gist

  • AI disruption. Generative AI is set to disrupt SEO significantly.
  • Content shielding. Brands need strategies to protect their content from AI.
  • Direct relationships. Building strong direct relationships is key.

Do your customers trust your brand more than ChatGPT?

The answer to that question will determine which brands truly have credibility and authority in the years ahead and which do not.

Those who are more trustworthy than generative AI engines will:

  1. Be destinations for answer-seekers, generating strong direct traffic to their websites and robust app usage.
  2. Be able to build large first-party audiences via email, SMS, push and other channels.

Both of those will be critical for any brand wanting to insulate themselves from the search engine optimization (SEO) traffic loss that will be caused by generative AI.

The Threat to SEO

Despite racking up 100 million users just two months after launching — an all-time record — ChatGPT doesn’t appear to be having a noticeable impact on the many billions of searches that happen every day yet. However, it’s not hard to imagine it and other large language models (LLMs) taking a sizable bite out of search market share as they improve and become more reliable.

And improve they will. After all, Microsoft, Google and others are investing tens of billions of dollars into generative AI engines. Long dominating the search engine market, Google in particular is keenly aware of the enormous risk to its business, which is why it declared a Code Red and marshalled all available resources into AI development.

If you accept that generative AI will improve significantly over the next few years — and probably dramatically by the end of the decade — and therefore consumers will inevitability get more answers to their questions through zero-click engagements, which are already sizable, then it begs the question:

What should brands consider doing to maintain brand visibility and authority, as well as avoid losing value on the investments they’ve made in content?

Protective Measures From Negative Generative AI Effects

Brands have two major levers they can pull to protect themselves from the negative effects of growing use of generative AI.

1. Shielding Content From Generative AI Training

Major legal battles will be fought in the years ahead to clarify what rights copyright holders have in this new age and what still constitutes Fair Use. Content and social media platforms are likely to try to redefine the copyright landscape in their favor, amending their user agreements to give themselves more rights over the content that’s shared on their platforms.

A white robot hand holds a gavel above a sound block sitting on a wooden table.
Andrey Popov on Adobe Stock Photo

You can already see the split in how companies are deciding to proceed. For example, while Getty Images’ is suing Stable Diffusion over copyright violations in training its AI, Shutterstock is instead partnering with OpenAI, having decided that it has the right to sell its contributors’ content as training material to AI engines. Although Shutterstock says it doesn’t need to compensate its contributors, it has created a contributors fund to pay those whose works are used most by AI engines. It is also giving contributors the ability to opt out of having their content used as AI training material.

Since Google was permitted to scan and share copyrighted books without compensating authors, it’s entirely reasonable to assume that generative AI will also be allowed to use copyrighted works without agreements or compensation of copyright holders. So, content providers shouldn’t expect the law to protect them.

Given all of that, brands can protect themselves by:

  • Gating more of their web content, whether that’s behind paywalls, account logins or lead generation forms. Although there are disputes, both search and AI engines shouldn’t be crawling behind paywalls.
  • Releasing some content in password-protected PDFs. While web-hosted PDFs are crawlable, password-protected ones are not. Because consumers aren’t used to frequently encountering password-protected PDFs, some education would be necessary. Moreover, this approach would be most appropriate for your highest-value content.
  • Distributing more content via subscriber-exclusive channels, including email, push and print. Inboxes are considered privacy spaces, so crawling this content is already a no-no. While print publications like books have been scanned in the past by Google and others, smaller publications would likely be safe from scanning efforts.

In addition to those, hopefully brands will gain a noindex equivalent to tell companies not to train their large language models (LLMs) and other AI tools on the content of their webpages.

Of course, while shielding their content from external generative AI engines, brands could also deploy generative AI within their own sites as a way to help visitors and customers find the information they’re looking for. For most brands, this would be a welcome augmentation to their site search functionality.

2. Building Stronger Direct Relationships

While shielding your content is the defensive play, building your first-party audiences is the offensive play. Put another way, now that you’ve kept your valuable content out of the hands of generative AI engines, you need to get it into the hands of your target audience.

You do that by building out your subscription-based channels like email and push. On your email signup forms, highlight the exclusive nature of the content you’ll be sharing. If you’re going to be personalizing the content that you send, highlight that, too.

Brands have the opportunity to both turn their emails into personalized homepages for their subscribers, as well as to turn their subscribers’ inboxes into personalized search engines.

Email Marketing Reinvents Itself Again

Brands already have urgent reasons to build out their first-party audiences. One is the sunsetting of third-party cookies and the need for more customer data. Email marketing and loyalty programs, in particular, along with SMS, are great at collecting both zero-party data through preference centers and progressive profiling, as well as first-party data through channel engagement data.

Another is the increasingly evident dangers of building on the “rented land” of social media. For example, Facebook is slowly declining, Twitter has cut 80% of its staff to avoid bankruptcy as its value plunges, and TikTok faces growing bans around the world. Some are even claiming we’re witnessing the beginning of the end of the age of social media. I wouldn’t go that far, but brands certainly have lots of reasons to focus more on those channels they have much more control over, including the web, loyalty, SMS, and, of course, email.

So, the disruption of search engine optimization by generative AI is just providing another compelling reason to invest more into email programs, or to acquire them. It’s hard not to see this as just another case of email marketing reinventing itself and making itself more relevant to brands yet again.

Feature Image Credit: Andrey Popov on Adobe Stock Photo

By Chad S. White

Chad S. White is the author of four editions of Email Marketing Rules and Head of Research for Oracle Marketing Consulting, a global full-service digital marketing agency inside of Oracle. Connect with Chad S. White:  

Sourced from CMSWIRE

By Miranda Nazzaro

Media titan Barry Diller confirmed Sunday he and a group of “leading publishers” plan to take legal action regarding the use of published works in training artificial intelligence (AI) systems.

Diller, the chairman and senior executive of internet and media conglomerate IAC, said he thinks generative AI is “overhyped, as all revolutions that are in the very beginning,” in an interview Sunday morning with CBS’s Margaret Brennan on “Face the Nation.”

AI systems are trained and improved using large language models, which ingest compilations of written works like books, news stories and social media posts.

Diller said he and others in the publishing industry don’t agree with how AI systems take in publishers’ content.

“It’s not that either Google or Microsoft, who are the two real leaders of this in terms of, certainly Google with having a monopoly on advertising. They, too, want to find a solution for publishers,” Diller told Brennan. “The problem is they also say that the fair use doctrine of copyright law allows them to suck up all this stuff.”

“It is, it will be, long-term catastrophic if there is not a business model that allows people professionally to produce content,” Diller continued. “That would be, I think everybody agrees is catastrophic.”

Diller claimed legislation or litigation is needed to protect the copyright of publishers.

“Of course, say we’re open to commercial agreements. But on the side of those people who are depending upon advertising, Google, for instance, they say, ‘Yes, we’ll give you a revenue share,’” Diller said. “Right now, the revenue share is zero. So, what percent of zero would you like today? I mean that’s rational, but it’s not the point. The only way you get to the point is protect fair use. In other words, protect the copyright.”

Diller would not disclose or confirm who is he planning to launch litigation with, only calling them “leading publishers.”

“It took 15 years to get back paywalls that protected publishers, I don’t think that same thing is going to happen,” Diller said.

When asked if generative AI poses a threat to Hollywood studio workers’ jobs, Diller said, “In this case, I think the one-to-three-year period, not much is going to happen. But post that, there are, of course, all these issues.”

Diller is not the first to consider legal action over AI publishing. Comedian Sarah Silverman and two other authors are currently suing Meta and OpenAI for alleged copyright infringement, claiming the platforms’ AI systems were “knowingly and secretly trained” with unauthorized copies of their books.

The Associated Press announced last week it would license its archive of news stories to ChatGPT maker OpenAI to help train the AI company’s system.

Feature Image Credit: (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)

By Miranda Nazzaro

Sourced from The Hill

By Jon Swartz

Google appears to be in a good position to compete for digital advertising against OpenAI

OpenAI’s ChatGPT loomed over Alphabet Inc.’s Google earlier this year, threatening the search giant’s core business of advertising.

But the menace, which seemed so dire in April, hasn’t materialized. Analysts increasingly believe Google GOOGL, +0.55% GOOG, +0.59% is well-positioned to compete for digital advertising against the initial outsize influence of startup OpenAI and its major investor, Microsoft Corp. MSFT, +0.18%, this year.

“As Google incorporates more [artificial-intelligence and machine-learning] tools … we have not seen any evidence of share shifts to [Microsoft’s] Bing, and in fact see ad budgets shifting back to [Google] Search as indications are that ad spend tailed off after the initial bump at Bing,” Deutsche Bank analyst Benjamin Black said in a note this month.

Black maintains a buy rating on Google shares, with a price target of $125.

Google’s brightened advertising outlook extends to rivals Meta Platforms Inc. META, -0.79%, Pinterest Inc. PINS, -2.00% and Yelp Inc. YELP, +3.02% as ad agencies loosen spending after a cautious start to 2023 because of economic uncertainties, Black said.

Analysts also anticipate Google search resilience despite the Bing threat, and they expect faster YouTube growth following several down quarters, with hopes high around the launch of NFL Sunday Ticket on YouTube TV this year.

Here’s what to expect when Alphabet’s numbers hit after Tuesday’s closing bell.

What to expect

Earnings: Analysts tracked by FactSet expect Alphabet to report $1.34 a share in earnings, up from $1.21 a year before. On Estimize, which crowdsources projections from hedge funds, academics and others, the average projection calls for $1.34 a share in earnings.

Revenue: The FactSet consensus calls for $72.8 billion in total revenue, up from $69.9 billion the previous year. Those contributing to Estimize expect $72.8 billion in revenue. Excluding traffic-acquisition costs, analysts from both FactSet and Estimize forecast $60.25 billion in revenue.

Stock movement: Alphabet shares have gained 36% so far this year. The broader S&P 500 SPX, -0.28% is up 18% in 2023.

Of the 50 analysts tracked by FactSet who cover Alphabet shares, 38 have buy ratings and four have hold ratings, with an average share-price target of $135.94.

What to watch for

Investors are keeping a close eye on Google Cloud, which accounts for a sliver of the company’s overall revenue.

Why? As most enterprises hash out their generative-AI strategies, it’s unclear how much benefit Google Cloud may reap in the second quarter and going forward. A second-half tailwind could offset ongoing cost-optimization headwinds, Jefferies analyst Brent Thill said in a note last week.

Goldman Sachs analyst Eric Sheridan maintained a buy rating on Alphabet shares with a price target of $140. “Broader industry conversations have continued to increase our conviction that [Alphabet] will be a long-term AI winner,” he said in a note last week.

“We think [Alphabet’s] potential for margin outperformance (especially into 2024), YouTube revenue reacceleration [and] sustained cloud computing growth (with improved margins) remain underappreciated,” Sheridan said.

Feature Image Credit: Getty Images

By Jon Swartz

Jon Swartz is a senior reporter for MarketWatch in San Francisco, covering many of the biggest players in tech, including Netflix, Facebook and Google. Jon has covered technology for more than 20 years, and previously worked for Barron’s and USA Today. Follow him on Twitter @jswartz.

Sourced from MarketWatch

ChatGPT is useful for some tasks, but what if it sounded more like you?

ChatGPT generates remarkably human-like write-ups but lacks something important: a unique personal voice. While ChatGPT can compose thoughtful prose on any topic, the phrasing often rings hollow. To make ChatGPT truly your writing companion, you need to train it to write with your style, pacing, word choices, and tone.

Fortunately, with a few prompting techniques, you can train ChatGPT to adopt a unique writing style that matches yours.

2 Ways to Teach ChatGPT to Write Like You

To get started, we’ll assume the persona of a detail-oriented author who uses a lively, engaging tone, provides detailed, accessible explanations, make liberal use of analogies, and address the reader directly throughout their text. The author also has a knack for using analogies to explain key concepts. Here’s a sample of the author’s work.

The task is to get ChatGPT to adopt the author’s writing style. Here we have three options. We can ask ChatGPT to write in a “detail-oriented, conversational manner using a lively, engaging tone, providing detailed, accessible explanations, making liberal use of analogies, and addressing the reader directly throughout their text”—much like the author. ChatGPT will oblige, but this approach will produce unpredictable results for several reasons. For example, how frequently does the author use analogies in each write-up? How informal does the author get? Does the author use light-hearted humor?

Trying to describe your writing style to ChatGPT will make the instruction way too broad. There are ways too many details that this approach wouldn’t be able to capture, resulting in a style that might not be in tune with that of the author; creating a ChatGPT prompt to deliver this information would be a challenge.

To teach ChatGPT to write like you, you can:

  1. Train ChatGPT with several samples of text you’ve written
  2. Use a Personal Preference Map (PPM)

Both options require a different approach, which you can check out below.

1. Training ChatGPT With Samples of Your Work

To train ChatGPT with samples of your work, head over to ChatGPT and use the prompt below, immediately followed by a sample of your written work that best captures your writing style.

Extract the writing style in the text provided below. Please study the tone, word choice, mannerism, sentence structure, pacing, explanation style, and other stylistic elements in order to mimic this author's unique voice: [Paste the sample here]

After using the prompt above, you should get a result similar to this:

Of course, one sample might not be enough to thoroughly capture every aspect of your writing style. So, you can repeat the prompt above with three to five more samples within the same ChatGPT conversation. After iterating through the number of samples you wish to use, you can then use the prompt below to unify the extracted styles.

Unify all the extracted writing styles and present them in a clear detailed form. 
Use the tone, word choice, sentence structure, pacing, explanations, and other 
stylistic elements you have extracted from the different samples provided to 
mimic this author's unique voice. Your instruction is to write an article 
on the topic: "Topic to write goes here." Maintain the author's perspective 
and attitudes while covering new subject. Write smoothly and convincingly 
in the author's distinctive voice.

The prompt above should immediately apply a combination of all the writing styles extracted from all the samples to write whichever topic you provided in the prompt. It doesn’t have to be an article, it can be an email, a speech, an essay, jokes, or even a song.

When working with normal write-ups like blogs or articles, if you want ChatGPT to stick to the structure and style of a writing sample as much as possible, using one sample (and, to a lesser extent, two samples) seems to be much more effective. To do this, use the prompt below:

Pay attention to the tone, word choice, mannerisms, sentence structure, pacing, explanation style, and other stylistic elements in order to mimic the unique style of the author of the text below. Use the same stylistic elements to write an article on the topic: "Some article topic goes here." [Paste the sample here]

Also, for the best results, we recommend using GPT-4 and, specifically, the GPT-4 Code Interpreter plugin for the task. You’ll be able to work with more text or even, ideally, stack several articles in a text or word file and ask ChatGPT to analyze the content for its writing style.

2. Training ChatGPT Using a Personal Preference Map (PPM)

A Personal Preference Map (PPM) is a key-value list of preferences ChatGPT can use to produce responses that better align with your preference. In this case, ChatGPT can extract a PPM from written samples to learn about your writing preferences and use it to replicate your writing style on demand. If you are unfamiliar with PPM, we’ve discussed it extensively in MakeUseOf’s eBook on Unlocking the Potential of ChatGPT. It is lightweight and easy to read, so do check it out.

To use a PPM, you’ll need to first extract it before using it as a prompt whenever you have something to write. To extract a PPM from samples of your work, use the prompt below:

I want you to extract a Personal Preference Map (PPM) from the data I provide in the next prompt. Now, a PPM is a key => value pair of conditions mapped to preferences. Below are examples of key => value pairs:

Tone => sarcastic, sassy, and loving

Word choice => formal, complex

Sentence structure => mixed of short and long, mostly short

Explanation style => imagery, vivid, relatable

Only reply affirmatively if you understand the task and do nothing else. When I provide the next prompt, extract the PPM using the same logic and formatting used above. The key => value pairs should be separated using “=>” Apart from the tone, word choice, and explanation style, I want you to include 10 other stylistic elements that better capture a writing style.

Using the prompt above on this article about how Auto-GPT is different from ChatGPT, we captured several stylistic elements the author uses in the article.

Extracted PPM using ChatGPT

Although the PPM approach is slightly more complex, it offers enormous attention to detail. While our previous method takes a more generalist approach to describing and applying an author’s style, PPM can get as detailed as possible, far more than anyone can easily discern at first glance.

Another advantage of using a PPM is the flexibility and portability it offers. You can easily tweak the writing style with precision by hanging a few words. You can also use the PPM in a different AI chatbot like Claude AI or Google Bard. We used the PPM above on the Claude AI chatbot and asked it to give it a topic to write. It was able to replicate as many of the stylistic elements used by the target author as possible.

Using ChatGPT PPM on Claude AI chatbot

Make ChatGPT Work for You

The beauty of ChatGPT is its versatility—with the right guidance, the AI chatbot can be taught to write in practically any style you want. If you’re tired of ChatGPT’s soulless writing style, you don’t have to settle for it. ChatGPT can do better than bland, generic outputs. With the right mix of training data, prompts, and feedback, you can transform this AI chatbot into your own writing doppelganger. Go for it.

By Maxwell Timothy

Sourced from MUO

Brands have two major levers they can pull to protect themselves from the negative effects of growing use of generative AI.

The Gist

  • AI disruption. Generative AI is set to disrupt SEO significantly.
  • Content shielding. Brands need strategies to protect their content from AI.
  • Direct relationships. Building strong direct relationships is key.

Do your customers trust your brand more than ChatGPT?

The answer to that question will determine which brands truly have credibility and authority in the years ahead and which do not.

Those who are more trustworthy than generative AI engines will:

  1. Be destinations for answer-seekers, generating strong direct traffic to their websites and robust app usage.
  2. Be able to build large first-party audiences via email, SMS, push and other channels.

Both of those will be critical for any brand wanting to insulate themselves from the search engine optimization (SEO) traffic loss that will be caused by generative AI.

The Threat to SEO

Despite racking up 100 million users just two months after launching — an all-time record — ChatGPT doesn’t appear to be having a noticeable impact on the many billions of searches that happen every day yet. However, it’s not hard to imagine it and other large language models (LLMs) taking a sizable bite out of search market share as they improve and become more reliable.

And improve they will. After all, Microsoft, Google and others are investing tens of billions of dollars into generative AI engines. Long dominating the search engine market, Google in particular is keenly aware of the enormous risk to its business, which is why it declared a Code Red and marshalled all available resources into AI development.

If you accept that generative AI will improve significantly over the next few years — and probably dramatically by the end of the decade — and therefore consumers will inevitability get more answers to their questions through zero-click engagements, which are already sizable, then it begs the question:

What should brands consider doing to maintain brand visibility and authority, as well as avoid losing value on the investments they’ve made in content?

Protective Measures From Negative Generative AI Effects

Brands have two major levers they can pull to protect themselves from the negative effects of growing use of generative AI.

1. Shielding Content From Generative AI Training

Major legal battles will be fought in the years ahead to clarify what rights copyright holders have in this new age and what still constitutes Fair Use. Content and social media platforms are likely to try to redefine the copyright landscape in their favour, amending their user agreements to give themselves more rights over the content that’s shared on their platforms.

A white robot hand holds a gavel above a sound block sitting on a wooden table.
Andrey Popov on Adobe Stock Photo

You can already see the split in how companies are deciding to proceed. For example, while Getty Images’ is suing Stable Diffusion over copyright violations in training its AI, Shutterstock is instead partnering with OpenAI, having decided that it has the right to sell its contributors’ content as training material to AI engines. Although Shutterstock says it doesn’t need to compensate its contributors, it has created a contributors fund to pay those whose works are used most by AI engines. It is also giving contributors the ability to opt out of having their content used as AI training material.

Since Google was permitted to scan and share copyrighted books without compensating authors, it’s entirely reasonable to assume that generative AI will also be allowed to use copyrighted works without agreements or compensation of copyright holders. So, content providers shouldn’t expect the law to protect them.

Given all of that, brands can protect themselves by:

  • Gating more of their web content, whether that’s behind paywalls, account logins or lead generation forms. Although there are disputes, both search and AI engines shouldn’t be crawling behind paywalls.
  • Releasing some content in password-protected PDFs. While web-hosted PDFs are crawlable, password-protected ones are not. Because consumers aren’t used to frequently encountering password-protected PDFs, some education would be necessary. Moreover, this approach would be most appropriate for your highest-value content.
  • Distributing more content via subscriber-exclusive channels, including email, push and print. Inboxes are considered privacy spaces, so crawling this content is already a no-no. While print publications like books have been scanned in the past by Google and others, smaller publications would likely be safe from scanning efforts.

In addition to those, hopefully brands will gain a noindex equivalent to tell companies not to train their large language models (LLMs) and other AI tools on the content of their webpages.

Of course, while shielding their content from external generative AI engines, brands could also deploy generative AI within their own sites as a way to help visitors and customers find the information they’re looking for. For most brands, this would be a welcome augmentation to their site search functionality.

2. Building Stronger Direct Relationships

While shielding your content is the defensive play, building your first-party audiences is the offensive play. Put another way, now that you’ve kept your valuable content out of the hands of generative AI engines, you need to get it into the hands of your target audience.

You do that by building out your subscription-based channels like email and push. On your email signup forms, highlight the exclusive nature of the content you’ll be sharing. If you’re going to be personalizing the content that you send, highlight that, too.

Brands have the opportunity to both turn their emails into personalized homepages for their subscribers, as well as to turn their subscribers’ inboxes into personalized search engines.

Email Marketing Reinvents Itself Again

Brands already have urgent reasons to build out their first-party audiences. One is the sunsetting of third-party cookies and the need for more customer data. Email marketing and loyalty programs, in particular, along with SMS, are great at collecting both zero-party data through preference centers and progressive profiling, as well as first-party data through channel engagement data.

Another is the increasingly evident dangers of building on the “rented land” of social media. For example, Facebook is slowly declining, Twitter has cut 80% of its staff to avoid bankruptcy as its value plunges, and TikTok faces growing bans around the world. Some are even claiming we’re witnessing the beginning of the end of the age of social media. I wouldn’t go that far, but brands certainly have lots of reasons to focus more on those channels they have much more control over, including the web, loyalty, SMS, and, of course, email.

So, the disruption of search engine optimization by generative AI is just providing another compelling reason to invest more into email programs, or to acquire them. It’s hard not to see this as just another case of email marketing reinventing itself and making itself more relevant to brands yet again.

By Chad S. White

Chad S. White is the author of four editions of Email Marketing Rules and Head of Research for Oracle Marketing Consulting, a global full-service digital marketing agency inside of Oracle.

Sourced from CMSWIRE

chatgpt,  digital experience, search, email marketing, artificial intelligence, generative ai, artificial intelligence in marketing

 

ChatGPT can enhance your abilities 10 times, but not if you’re a 0, because 10×0 amounts to 0

‘Get richer with ChatGPT’, ‘Making money online got easier’, ‘How you can make money with ChatGPT’, ‘Access my database of 125+ ChatGPT prompts to help you make money online for $5’.

Wait, stop, calm down!

So, if you’re fed up with all these paid advertisements trying to push different courses down your throats, luring you to make ‘easy’ money using ChatGPT, welcome to the club! Search engines and social media platforms like Instagram, Twitter, Facebook and even LinkedIn are brimming with such posts. These ‘influencers’ make ChatGPT seem like an easy money-minting machine.

But have people actually been able to monetise ChatGPT and its free version? Well, a lot of individuals claim to have been leveraging its capabilities to generate income. From branding to app-creation to providing writing services, they claim it opens avenues to earn ‘free money’ whether you’re an aspiring entrepreneur, content creator, or a freelancer.

You must’ve also come across tons of articles listing numerous ways to rake in the greens. These articles usually either bank on the chatbot’s capabilities to code and hint at it being used to build apps or websites ‘without any prior knowledge’ or for affiliate marketing, content marketing, optimising video production, or becoming a prompting expert amongst many other things.

However, there are some who claim to have made money this way. Ukrainian entrepreneur Ihor Stefurak built a Chrome extension using ChatGPT despite having zero coding knowledge. He claims to have generated $1000 in revenue within just 24 hours of launching the extension.

Many such claims and tutorials are flying fast and thick on YouTube, claiming to help make $100 a day but seem to know nothing about the tool, the model it is based on or even its name. Some coolly call it ChatGTP!

Meanwhile, there has also been a notable surge in AI-written ebooks on Amazon. These are ranked as high as 50,377 on the Kindle book store and also have five-star ratings in the hundreds. According to reports, as of mid-February there were over 200 e-books in Amazon’s Kindle store, listing ChatGPT as the author or co-author. The number may not seem like a lot but the actual number may be much higher since many authors do not disclose in the Kindle store that their book was written entirely, or in part, by a computer because Amazon’s policies do not require it.

In fact, the market is so saturated that making decent money out of this is improbable. According to Reuters, Brett Schickler, who wrote a children’s book titled, ‘The Wise Little Squirrel: A Tale of Saving and Investing’, (sold at the Amazon Kindle store for $2.99 and $9.99 for a printed version) netted less than $100.

Can Only Enhance 

The reality is that ChatGPT alone cannot guarantee financial success. While ChatGPT can be an invaluable tool in reducing your workload, it is crucial to understand that it is not a magical solution that will automatically generate top-tier content for you. If you lack familiarity with a particular subject, you will struggle to differentiate between good and poor quality content.

For example, let’s consider a scenario where you follow someone’s advice on starting a successful blogging business with the assistance of ChatGPT despite having no prior experience in content creation. Even if ChatGPT generates a basic piece of content, you might perceive it as exceptional because you lack the knowledge of what constitutes top-tier content.

What you can actually do is create videos on how to make money with AI. As they say, ‘When there’s a gold rush, sell shovels and pickaxes’.

On a serious note, what you can actually do is automate parts of your workflow with ChatGPT APIs, which are free to use. One can take up email affiliate marketing, content marketing, or learn and preach better avenues like prompt engineering.

It is crucial not to be deceived by influencers who disseminate misleading content. Do not believe them when they claim that ChatGPT holds the secret to success or that it can effortlessly make you money. Instead, focus on learning and honing your skills, utilising ChatGPT as a tool to support you in accomplishing your goals.

Shyam is a tech journalist with expertise in policy and politics, and exhibits a fervent interest in scrutinising the convergence of AI and analytics in society. In his leisure time, he indulges in anime binges and mountain hikes.

Sourced from AIM