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By Rodney Laws.

It’s hard to imagine a post-COVID world right now. No one can be sure when we’ll get back to normal and what normal will look like. Trying to plan for the future feels fruitless, and yet it will feel like everything is happening at once, so you need to be prepared.

For business owners and marketing departments, this presents the challenge of how to approach advertising in a post-COVID world. Have the fundamentals changed, and what is a safe promotional route to go down? Here’s how you can pivot your strategy ready for a new world.

Be content cautious

As the reality of coronavirus and lockdown measures started to set in, a new type of marketing content cropped up on our televisions and social media feeds.

Suddenly sentimental, coronavirus-themed content was in every other ad you saw. This uplifting content generally focused on people’s sacrifices throughout the crisis, how we’re all in this together, and what businesses are doing for you in your time of need. For many, this content provides assurance and shows companies understand what people need most.

The question for marketers once this crisis is over, or at least starting to wind down, is how do you move on from this content, and will coronavirus-tinged content still be appropriate? As people assess the full impact of the virus is it right to use their situation to push them towards purchases, if it ever was?

To pivot your content direction post-COVID you need to be aware of the genuine concerns people will have in regards to making coronavirus your focus. You need to balance the fine line of being aware of the current circumstances without appearing to take advantage of them.

Creating media that captures the public mood and shows appreciation for their feelings can really grab attention and cut through the mass of competition of social media channels. People don’t mind being advertised to if they think the brand genuinely has their best interests at heart. That involves offering something back, even if it’s just a message of support.

You should also look to create content that is genuinely informative. Try and educate people within your specialism on the common coronavirus issues. Slipping in a bit of promotional while doing so is fine, as you’re providing a service. People will want to set up good social distancing measures at work, so suggest creative ways to do so. It may not directly result in conversions, but it’ll build up goodwill with your brand.

The most successful post-COVID content will likely look a lot like the best campaigns we’ve seen throughout the campaign. Let shareable content filmed through Zoom calls inspire you and make sure not to misjudge people’s emotions.

Consider your finances

It’s safe to say most people are expecting things to get a little bit tighter financially after coronavirus.

As if the toil of the virus alone isn’t bad enough, it has also led to significant economic turmoil across the world. With many businesses operating on a much stricter budget — if any budget at all — the money is unlikely to be there for extravagant marketing campaigns. Just like you can’t act like your audience has money to burn, you need to operate securely yourself.

It’s important your marketing starts slowly and tries to avoid as many costly mistakes as possible. Ideally, you can look to follow the example set by small businesses. You don’t need to start from scratch, but approaching your marketing expenses in the way a startup or entrepreneur would will help you make low-investment risks when it comes to pivoting your strategy. These businesses rarely operate with a high-risk, high-reward mentality, which can be a great guide through this tricky period.

Your first campaign after the coronavirus pandemic doesn’t need to be an all-time-great homerun in advertising, but it can’t be something you bet the immediate future of the company on. Businesses are going to be judged not just by how they responded to the outbreak, but how they continue to respond throughout the recovery.

Think small scale with your marketing. Extravagant short films about the bravery of people throughout the crisis may be great, uplifting content, but they can be costly to produce. Whereas taking a more subtle, low-key approach within the budget constraints of a smaller business can help you show support, while accomplishing the long-term promotion and converting goals of your marketing.

Focus on localization

All future marketing strategies in a post-COVID world need to take into consideration the rate at which recovery is happening not just across the world, but in individual countries.

Universal advertising will be irrelevant in the days immediately after the virus. Different messages will mean different things to unique audience. You cannot make content that looks to celebrate defeating the virus available to a region that is still suffering significantly. It is insensitive and will tarnish the respectability and perceived competency of your brand.

Either try and keep your content more general or be hyper-specific in your location. If you want to run an after-COVID paid social campaign, for example, make sure you’re only targeting areas where recovery has been successful and you’re ready to pause it should the worst happen.

While celebrating national success may sound like a great opportunity to balance showing appreciation with brand exposure, this can, especially online, backfire pretty dramatically if you’re not hyper-specific in your execution.

Stick with online services

Despite it feeling like we’re all scratching at the walls looking for an escape from lockdown, it won’t be as simple as everyone rushing back into normal life once it’s lifted.

Not only will there be significant social distancing measures in place, but people’s attitudes and outlook will have changed. People have not just considered what they value, but there will be a residual fear of the virus.

Online services, be it video chat allowing you to talk to your family or an ecommerce store that can keep you stock up throughout lockdown, have shown their worth throughout this pandemic. With people reluctant to dive into normality once again, there will still be a need for these businesses.

All of this is to say you shouldn’t abandon any online services you’ve developed just yet. It’ll be wise to continue promoting these products and services even after coronavirus. Forced exposure to them has only increased interest from the average consumer and business.

Take Zoom as an example. People may be sick of video chats by the time this is all over, but businesses will still find practical uses in it as we return to normality, now aware of a tool that allows them to better connect with business partners abroad and open people up to new types of remote working options.

Likewise, many businesses may stick with remote working for the foreseeable future. This allows you to tweak your marketing, rather than fully pivot it, to just reflect the usefulness of your products and services, rather than play into the whole lockdown and remote working narrative. You don’t need to fully re-think your strategy straight away.

Consider scheduling changes

With efforts to return to normality likely to be slow, you need to consider how you’re going to schedule your content and try and capture attention online.

Before COVID, you were able to research when people were most likely online to try and capture their attention in the most effective way. Numerous studies had been conducted across all the major social platforms, showing when someone was most likely be susceptible to a Facebook video, Twitter Poll or Instagram influencer story.

A lot of these results were determined by pre-COVID schedules. People would commute to and from work roughly at the same time. They’d relax on the couch and browse social media for a bit most evenings. They may be more likely to buy something at a weekend when they have time to sit down and consider the item. That’s all out the window now, and may not be back for a while.

Likewise, people are also going to be spending more time catching up with loved ones if they do choose to go out. There are arguments to suggest that coronavirus could be the end of abject consumerism, and that marketers will have to be more creative in their efforts to draw people away from personal connections and back to social platforms to witness content and advertising.

To acclimatize to the new reality of your customer base you need to either conduct new audience research or find new avenues to reach your base in. A post-COVID strategy will be reflective of new lifestyles, slowly easing itself back into traditional timings. Consider experimenting with new approaches in your advertising, such as Google paid campaigns that can catch search audiences looking for something specific, rather than casting a wide net across social media.

Marketing in a post-COVID world will be challenging, there’s no doubt about that. It won’t be an impossible task though. It will require more audience research and tactile reading of public mood than ever before. Be prepared to backtrack at points and be cautious when taking risks.

Feature Image Credit: Unsplash

By Rodney Laws

Rodney Laws has more than a decade of experience providing marketing advice to online entrepreneurs and businesses. He’s set up and marketed his own businesses and consulted on crafting campaigns for established companies. See what Rodney can do to help you or your business by heading over to EcommercePlatforms.io and visiting @EcomPlatformsio for even more news and views on marketing as an ecommerce brand.

 

By Cristian Stanciu.

Video marketing statistics are super important when planning your marketing strategy.

There is a ton of data available online, but not all of it is up to date. And being “up to date” is very important in the fast-changing world of digital marketing.

We gathered the most recent data we could find about video content and you can find it all below.

We’re almost halfway through the year. It hasn’t panned out the way we thought. But, we can still make it work.

Facing a lockdown, many of us have realized the importance of video content. Its power not only to entertain but also to unite and educate has shown that video content in its various forms is the future of online marketing.

Luckily for us, I did not see any decrease in the demand for our video editing services, so that’s one thing to be happy about.

If you haven’t done before, now is the right time to invest in video marketing. For those who are already using video content; it’s time to redouble your efforts.

Are you in two minds? Unsure whether to invest in video marketing?

Today, we share important video marketing statistics that’ll show investing in video content will prove to be the best decision you’ll make in 2020, or, the second-best after social distancing.

We’ll highlight the popularity of video content among marketers and consumers. Moreover, we’ll look at the predictions and plans that the brands, businesses, and video marketers have for this type of content. Finally, draw attention to social media and video channels that are doing well and those that have huge potential going forward.

This is the only resource you need to stay up-to-date and stay on top of the video marketing game.

Why is Video Marketing Important?

People are leaning towards online video content more than ever before. The numbers are there for everyone to see:

  • According to Cisco, soon 82% of all web traffic will move towards video content.
  • In 2021, an average person will spend as much as 100 minutes of his/her everyday life watching videos online.
  • Users are twice as likely to share videos compared to other content types.
  • 54% of people want to see more video content in 2020.
  • In the United States, 56% of the young ones (8 to 12-year-olds) and 66% of the teens (13 to 19-year-olds) view videos online every day.

Bottom Line: In 2019, people spent 84 minutes a day watching online videos. The data shows, we can expect a 19% increase in time spent on videos in just 2 years.

The Head of Forecasting at Zenith, Jonathan Barnard, agrees that online video consumption has rapidly increased. Users now spend on online videos more than half of the time that they normally devote to regular television programs.

According to him, the boost in viewership has increased the demand for video marketers.

The demand for advertisers and the increase in expenditure shows that at present video marketing is the fast-growing digital channel.

Video Marketing and Return of Interest (ROI)

Video marketers seem to be real gung-ho about including video in their marketing plan for 2020.

But, is it really worth spending time, money, and effort? The following statistics seem to suggest that it is.

  • 89% of marketers say using video content increases their ROI.
  • 87% of all marketers say using video content has helped drive traffic to their website.
  • 83% of all marketers feel using videos improves lead generation.
  • 80% of marketers feel video content has increased their sales.

Bottom Line: The majority of video marketers are obsessed with videos for a reason.

No one can deny the benefits of video content in promoting and marketing brands and businesses.

For example, SAP received millions of impressions after their video marketing campaign.

Further, a marketing campaign with heavy video content helped Tiger Fitness achieve a 60% repeat customer rate, which is 3x times the industry average.

Video Marketing: Who Is Using It?

Let’s not assume anything. It’s best to start from scratch. How widespread is video marketing? Who is using it and their plans for the future?

  • As high as 92% of all marketers agree that video content is a vital part of their marketing strategy.
  • 66% of B2C marketers have used video content in their marketing strategy.
  • 71% of B2B marketers have used video content in their marketing strategy.
  • 99% of marketers that are already using video marketing will continue to do so in 2020.
  • 59% of marketers who did not use video marketing in 2019, said they’ll make it part of their marketing strategy in 2020.
  • 95% of marketers say they will maintain or even increase the spending on video marketing.

Bottom Line: In 2020 and beyond, two-thirds of marketers are planning to use video marketing.

You don’t want to miss out on this opportunity. But, bear in mind, the competition for user attention is going to be fierce.

To beat the competition, make sure you learn your customer behavior and their decision-making process.

How Does Video Content Help Brands and Businesses?

Video Marketing Promotes Brand Awareness

Compared to other marketing channels, video content is more popular, engaging, and memorable, which is why it’s the right tool to promote brand awareness.

Here are the numbers to back that up.

  • People will spend 88% more time on a website with video content.
  • 72% of consumers prefer video to text content while researching a product or service.
  • 53% of people engage with a brand after watching one of their videos on social media.
  • 68% of consumers prefer to engage with brands that use video.
  • 96% of people view explainer video to understand a product or service.

Bottom Line: The first and perhaps the most important influencer that drives the sales process is none other than Brand Awareness.

It isn’t enough that the customers know your name. Customers also want to know the values you stand for.

No other content type, except videos, give businesses the opportunity and freedom to get creative and develop quality content that best explains their vision and mission to the customers.

Video Marketing Helps Generate Leads

From the above statistics, we know that video marketing promotes brand awareness. Does it also generate leads? Yes, here are the key numbers you should know:

  • 81% of video marketers state videos help generate leads.
  • 84% of video marketers state videos boost traffic to their website.
  • 80% of video marketers say that videos increased the time visitors spend on the website.
  • 41% of video marketers say the use of videos has led to lesser support calls.

Bottom Line: Videos, even the short ones, give you the opening needed to move the customers along the sales funnel. For example, a short 30-second introduction video from Campaign Monitor explains the benefits of signing up with them.

How do marketers use such videos for lead generation?

Marketers encourage customers to use the link provided in the video description to visit an e-mail opt-in landing page.

Marketers send a thank you message to viewers who have shared, reacted, or commented on the video. Along with the ‘Thank You’ message, they encourage viewers to subscribe to their newsletter.

Video Marketing Boosts Sales

All the effort a marketer makes is directly or indirectly aimed at driving sales. And, as the stats show, video marketing helps generate sales.

  • 84% of consumers have made up their mind to purchase a product or service after viewing a brand’s video.
  • 74% of consumers have made up their mind to download or buy an app or software after viewing a video.
  • At least 55% of people engaged in shopping watch videos while in the store.

Bottom Line: Brands believe that interacting and connecting with their customers will boost trust and pave way for more sales.

A good example, Adobe found that people who watch demo videos of their products are 1.8x times more likely to buy, than those who don’t.

What Does the Video Marketing Statistics Say about Customer Behavior and Preferences?

Only good, creative, and personalized content resonates with the customers.

Millions of videos and billions of hours of content are added to the online pool every day. You need to stand out from the crowd.

For that, video marketers need to provide content that’s personalized and tailored to their individual tastes, needs, and preferences.

Why Personalized Video Is the New Mantra in Video Marketing?

  • 60% of all marketers say the personalization of video content will improve the quality of the leads.
  • 48% of people want videos to reflect the products or services they are interested in.
  • 72% of people say they will only show interest in personalized video content.
  • 43% of consumers want to decide what videos they want to watch and when to watch.

Bottom Line: Tailored content seems to be on-trend for 2020.

Personalized content allows video marketers to provide highly targeted solutions to the user’s needs.

It also helps develop a customer-brand relationship and allows customers to arrive at buying decisions faster.

By giving personalized content, brands become more memorable and trustworthy.

90% of customers prefer to purchase from brands and businesses that are memorable and trustworthy.

What Does that the Statistics Say about Video Length?

  • Longer videos, those that are more than 15 minutes garner 50% of all video engagements.
  • Only 8% of all marketing videos are 15 minutes or longer.
  • In the case of business videos, 68% of people will watch the whole video if its length is 1 minute or less.
  • Nearly 80% of all marketing videos produced are under 5 minutes.

Bottom Line: The old belief that the attention span of people is shrinking will be put to test in the coming years.

The statistics show that marketers prefer to use shorter videos. There are different theories on this subject.

Some feel that shorter videos fail to create emotional connections with customers.

In contrast, there are many who root for shorter videos because they are easily digestible and more suitable for social media.

So, video marketers need to consider several factors like the nature of the business, type of content, marketing platform, etc. before deciding the length of the video.

What Type of Video Content do Customers Want to See?

  • 86% of consumers would want brands to use more videos in 2020, and out of these, 36% prefer explainer videos and 14% want more product demonstrations.
  • 39% of consumers want explainer videos on products or services from brands.

Bottom Line: Why is explainer video so effective? Interestingly, there is a scientific explanation for their success.

Explainer videos use the visual and audio stimulus to explain a product, service, or concept in a simple and easily comprehensible way.

The use of both communication mediums boosts message retention in the customers.

The first and foremost requirement to make an excellent explainer video is the script.

A well-written script will greatly increase the chances of the explainer video going viral.

Plus, apart from brand awareness, an explainer video is a great way to generate leads and increase sales.

What Do the Statistics Say about Video Orientation and Features?

  • 39% of the marketers now go for square or vertical videos as compared to horizontal videos.
  • 82% of consumers are put off by videos that are not optimized to their preferred orientation.
  • 75% of consumers say they didn’t purchase a product due to annoying video voiceover.
  • 83% of consumers prefer chatty and informal tone in the videos.
  • 92% of people want to view video content with the sound off.
  • 50% of people say that captions for videos are a must because they watch without sound.
  • According to Verizon, 55% of consumers want captions for tips videos, 53% want captions for food and 52% want captions for news videos.

Bottom Line: Most social media platforms have adopted square or vertical video orientation.

The reason is simple, 94% of the users hold their mobile vertically and 57% of all video views are on a hand-held device.

Next to the script and quality of the video, the tone and voice style are the most important factors that determine the success of a video. This is clearly reflected in the video marketing statistics.

Even if you have a great video in your hands, with an excellent script and casual, informal, and friendly tone, there is always a way to make it better.

One of the best video tips for marketers is to add captions. Customers like captions because it improves accessibility, boost SEO, and help the audience better understand the content.

What Other Video Marketing Tactics have Gained Traction among Customers and Marketers?

  • According to Magnifyre, the viewership of 360-degree video was 29% higher than regular video.
  • The Click-through Rate (CTR) of a 360-degree video was 4.51%, whereas the CTR of the regular video was only 0.56%.
  • 15% of all marketers plan to use 360-degree videos for marketing in 2020.
  • 57% of all marketers are using live videos; of which, nearly 34% of marketers use Facebook Live and 13% use Instagram Live feature.
  • 79% of consumers feel live videos make the content more authentic and 63% feel live videos add a human touch to marketing.
  • 21% of marketers say they’ll use interactive video in 2020.
  • 12% of marketers say they’ll use Virtual Reality (VR) for video marketing in 2020.

Bottom Line: Use of 360-degree, Virtual Reality, and Live videos are a great way to increase viewer count, engage with customers and make them stay longer, retain their attention, develop a relationship, and, most importantly, offer them a unique experience.

These new marketing techniques also help the brand stand out from the crowd.

The Importance of Having Videos on Social Media Platforms

Most social media networks, except YouTube, started out as text-rich networks.

Lately, video content has gate-crashed their party. There has been an explosion of video content on almost all social networks.

As you’ll find out soon, after reading the statistics which are to follow, the numbers are huge.

Social Media is indispensable for video marketing because that’s where a large percentage of the online population spends their time every day.

Besides, videos and social media are good examples of a mutualistic relationship.

Social media is important for video marketing. Equally, video content is also important for the success of the social media campaign.

  • 58% of people visit the social media page of a brand before accessing the brand’s website.
  • 60% of users who bought a product learn about the brand from social media.
  • Compared to last year, 24% of users are buying a product or service because of ads on social media platforms.
  • YouTube, Facebook, and Instagram are the top three purchase-driving social media platforms.

Why should you Use YouTube for Video Marketing?

  • Each day, 1.5 billion people watch 1 billion hours of video on YouTube
  • 65% of senior executives access the website after watching a related YouTube video.
  • 85% of all marketers have used YouTube in 2019 for video marketing.
  • 83% of marketers feel YouTube has boosted their marketing efforts.
  • On YouTube, there has been a 70% increase in users who search for ‘How-to’ videos.
  • In the past two years alone, the number of people viewing shopping-related video content on YouTube has increased 5 times.
  • In a week, compared to all cable TV networks, YouTube reaches more people in the 18 to 49-year-old age group.

Bottom Line: YouTube is still the best platform for video marketing. In addition, YouTube also helps brands improve SEO, gain authority, and build trust. Although YouTube is the natural home of the video content, there are many ways to market videos without YouTube. Here are other social media platforms for videos.

Why Use Videos on Facebook?

  • On average, nearly 8 billion videos are viewed on Facebook every day.
  • 79% of marketers say they use Facebook for video marketing and 85% of them feel the move has been successful.
  • 75 million people use the Facebook Video platform on a daily bases.
  • 60% of the users don’t go beyond the two-minute mark to watch a video.
  • 65% of people say they skip the video if the first ten seconds doesn’t interest them.
  • 81% of businesses say they like to use the social media platform (Facebook) for their video marketing.

Bottom Line: Let’s start with the obvious reason. At any given time, millions of people around the world use Facebook. If you want your brand to be right under the noses of your target audience, then Facebook is the platform to use. Plus, having your videos on Facebook increases their chance of going viral.

What Do the Statistics Say about Using Videos on Instagram?

  • Instagram has nearly 800 million active monthly users.
  • 72% of people buy a product after viewing a video on Instagram.
  • 75% of people take action after watching a brand video on Instagram.
  • 65% of ad impressions on the platform come from video content.

Bottom Line: Research shows that customers have expressed interest in knowing a brand after watching a video on Instagram Stories. On top, many brands have seen a spike in sales thanks to the video content on the platform.

Why Use LinkedIn for Video Marketing?

  • 51% of all marketers said they use LinkedIn for video marketing.
  • 87% of video marketers who used LinkedIn say the platform proved to be a successful channel for video marketing in 2019.
  • Videos on the company page produce 5 times more engagement in comparison to other content types.

Bottom Line: LinkedIn is a platform for professionals, entrepreneurs, and businesses. The platform was created for building relationships between these three categories of people. As you see in the stats, LinkedIn is a great place to connect with others, present your brand, tell your story, and spread awareness about your product, service, or brand. Moreover, brands can boost their popularity and trustworthiness by displaying customer testimonials on their LinkedIn business page.

How Does Twitter Help in Video Marketing?

  • Although Twitter is a text-based platform, 82% of people say they mainly view videos on the platform.
  • 72% of marketers use Twitter for video marketing and 84% say this strategy is working for them.
  • 90% of all videos on Twitter are watched using hand-held devices.
  • 45% of people using Twitter want more celebrity videos.

Bottom Line: Twitter can be used to share small snippets or teasers of larger videos. Twitter videos are ideal for generating hype and interest in a product or business.

Should You Be Using Snapchat for Video Marketing?

  • In 2019, only 11% of the video marketers have used Snapchat and less than 50% of them have benefited from using the platform.
  • 10 billion videos are watched on Snapchat every day.
  • On average, 25 minutes of video content is consumed daily on Snapchat.

Bottom Line: Video marketers haven’t really gravitated towards this platform because Snapchat accepts videos that are only 10 seconds long. Hence, regular videos won’t fit in this platform.

What Do the Statistics Say About Other Platforms?

  • TikTok remains underused with only 10% of all video marketers using the platform and 66% of them tasting success.
  • 15% of all marketers say they’ll use TikTok for video marketing in 2020.
  • 79% of all marketers that have used video channels say they have benefited from the move.

Final Thoughts

Dice and slice, and analyze these video marketing statistics in every possible way. All the hard facts and figures needed to frame a video marketing strategy for 2020 and beyond is here.

If you want to reach the top of the marketing game or stay up there, it isn’t enough to simply create videos. You need to know ‘what type of videos to create?’, ‘when to create?’, ‘whom to target?’, ‘where to use?’, ‘when to use?’ Etc. The answers to all your queries are in these statistics.

Resources used in this article:

https://www.lemonlight.com/blog/67-video-marketing-stats-you-need-to-know-for-2020

https://www.impactbnd.com/blog/new-video-marketing-statistics

https://www.oberlo.com/blog/video-marketing-statistics

https://www.smartinsights.com/digital-marketing-platforms/video-marketing/video-marketing-statistics-to-know

https://www.smartinsights.com/digital-marketing-platforms/video-marketing/video-marketing-trends-2020

https://www.magnifyre.com/360-degree-video-case-study

https://www.wyzowl.com/video-marketing-statistics-2020

https://financesonline.com/video-marketing-trends

https://optinmonster.com/video-marketing-statistics-what-you-must-know

https://blog.hubspot.com/marketing/state-of-video-marketing-new-data

By Cristian Stanciu.

Cristian Stanciu is a freelance video editor, owner and post-production coordinator of Veedyou Media – a company offering video
editing services
to videographers, marketing agencies, video production
studios or brands all over the globe. I can catch up with him on his
blog or on LinkedIn.

Sourced from VEEDYOU MEDIA

By

I’ve already explained why I predict 2020 will be the year of the customer. The traditional, tried-and-true marketing methods of getting people to know about your brand and buy your products are no longer as effective as they once were. Successful marketing strategies in 2020 and beyond will focus on creating great customer experiences and building relationships with your audience.

This shift has already been happening for a while, but not all businesses have fully embraced this new way of thinking about marketing. We’re now at the start of the New Year, and it’s a great time to be thinking ahead and making strategic decisions for your business that will bring positive returns.

If your business is not yet putting your customers at the heart of your marketing strategy, now is the time to make the change. And if you think your strategy is already customer-driven, it may well be worth reviewing the process anyway. Many businesses claim that they have their customers’ best interests at heart, but their marketing strategy says something different.

Quick Takeaways

  • Concentrate on providing great customer experiences, and most of the hard work of marketing is done for you.
  • Rather than creating products first and seeking out customers later, think about your customers first and use their needs to help you develop products they actually want.
  • Knowing and understanding your customers is critical to the success of this strategy. Collect data from several different channels and sources to build up a clear picture of who exactly your target market is.
  • Customer-first marketing goes beyond the responsibilities of the marketing team. Everyone in the company must understand how to provide great customer service and experiences.

What Is a Customer-Driven Marketing Strategy?

Let’s start by going back to basics: what exactly is a customer-driven marketing strategy?

Rather than thinking about your business or your products and how you’re going to market them, you start by thinking about your customers: Who are they? What makes them tick? How can you help solve their problems?

By shifting the focus away from your brand and onto the customer, you ensure you’re meeting their needs. Over time this builds strong customer relationships and builds brand loyalty as you’re demonstrating that you’re working to create better solutions for them and not simply trying to make money out of them.

Image source: https://medium.com/@sandboxcommerce/product-driven-lead-generation-and-sales-driven-product-development-e6588807e584

So this approach means thinking about your customers and their needs before you do anything else. In fact, you’ll soon realize that this strategy goes way beyond marketing. When you consider your customers’ challenges, motivations, and desires first, it affects the entire way you run your business. A customer-driven strategy means you’ll be creating products and services that your customers actually want and need rather than what you think they want.

1. Identify Your Target Market

You can’t serve your customers if you don’t really know who they are, so the first and most crucial step of building your marketing strategy is to define your market and segment it so you can target each group more effectively.

Depending on your brand and business, you may be targeting one small market segment or several segments with varying needs and characteristics. You might have a good idea of who your customer base is already, but don’t make assumptions. It’s important to carry out thorough market research from a number of sources, including web and social analytics, studying competitors, your own customer databases, and customer surveys in order to build up a true picture of the demographics and needs of each market.

Once you have the data, creating a customer avatar or buyer persona for each target market is the next step. This is a text and visual summary of the average “ideal” customer you’re targeting in each market segment. This can really help you to create marketing materials that resonate with your audience as you have a detailed image in mind of who you’re trying to reach with your marketing messages.

Image source: https://neilpatel.com/blog/create-reinforce-buyer-personas/

2. Create Solutions for Your Customers’ Needs

Your initial customer research should inform you about what your customers actually want. You can then use this market intelligence to develop products and services to meet their needs. This approach is of course the opposite to what many businesses do, which is deciding on their products and services first and then seeking out customers to buy them!

With a customer-first strategy, advertising and traditional marketing methods are no longer needed because you don’t have to hunt out your customers ­­– they’re already right there telling you what you want. As long as you really listen to what they have to say, the hard work is done.

3. Use Customer Feedback to Improve Your Offering

Tools such as live chat and online feedback forums can be a valuable way to communicate with your customers.

Using customer feedback and requests will not only help you to create better products and services in the future, but demonstrating to your customers that you’re listening to their opinion and that it actually matters is a powerful way to build trust and loyalty.

Because customer communication is such a vital part of a customer-driven marketing strategy, your customer service team becomes integral to your overall marketing plan. Ensuring that every person in the company who interacts with customers in any way offers an excellent customer experience brings benefits to both sides. The customer gets the help they need and enjoys positive interactions with your team, and your business builds a better brand reputation and learns more about how to create better products.

Image source: https://helpcrunch.com/blog/customer-driven-marketing-strategy/

When your customers are happy with what they buy from you and how they communicate with you, they’ll tell their friends. And this word-of-mouth marketing can be more powerful and have a bigger and longer-lasting impact than any type of advertising or SEO campaign.

If you are ready to get more traffic to your site with quality content that’s consistently published, check out our Content Builder Service. Set up a quick consultation, and I’ll send you a free PDF version of my books. Get started today and generate more traffic and leads for your business.

By

Michael Brenner is a globally-recognized keynote speaker, author of The Content Formula and the CEO of Marketing Insider Group. He has worked in leadership positions in sales and marketing for global brands like SAP and Nielsen, as well as for thriving startups. Today, Michael shares his passion on leadership and marketing strategies that deliver customer value and business impact. He is recognized by the Huffington Post as a Top Business Keynote Speaker and a top CMO influencer by Forbes. Please follow him on LinkedIn, Twitter, or Facebook and Subscribe here for regular updates.

Sourced from Marketing Insider Group

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John Wanamaker, marketing pioneer of the 19th century, is famously quoted to have said, “Half the money I spend on advertising is wasted; the trouble is I don’t know which half.” Though this statement was made more than 100 years ago, I believe it still rings true for many business-to-business technology companies.

As the founder and president of a B2B marketing firm, I know that unlike Wanamaker, modern companies have advanced marketing automation and analytics platforms at their fingertips. But these platforms alone can’t build a solid strategy. They need input.

Why Marketing Strategy Matters 

In the quest to automate marketing journeys with artificial intelligence and machine learning, it’s easy to overlook the essential element that defines your product or service’s value to the market.

“Marketing strategy” is a loose term few fully understand. It’s not the same as marketing planning or a go-to-market strategy. Let’s define the terms:

• A marketing strategy details a company’s long-term marketing goals and objectives.

• Marketing planning aims to achieve marketing strategy goals with tactical activities and campaigns.

• A go-to-market strategy is the value proposition launched to potential customers. It’s often attached to a company, product or service launch.

The challenge most companies run into, especially in the B2B technology space, is failing to create marketing strategies that are supported by qualitative and quantitative research.

Anyone can write a marketing strategy, but if it’s lacking a clear value proposition based on customer research and buyer personas, it’s unlikely to move your business forward.

Elements Of An Effective Marketing Strategy

The most successful marketing strategies contain three core elements: deep customer knowledge, distinct branding and messaging, and market analysis.

Let’s dig deeper.

1. Understand your customers.

This sounds simple. You probably already have some idea of who your ideal customers are. But do you really know them?

Assuming, rather than asking questions, is where many marketing organizations run into trouble. Quality customer research takes time and needs to be updated a least once per year.

To truly know your customers, you must understand:

• What they want.

• What pains them.

• Where they’re searching for in a solution.

• How to reach them (i.e., content, social media, email, website, etc.).

These dynamics change, and without proper feedback loops, you could miss out on important shifts and opportunities within the marketplace.

At many of the companies we work with, time and resources get in the way of creating and updating effective buyer personas. If companies have them at all, they’re often a few years old and at the bottom of someone’s priority list to update. The companies we see generating the greatest return on investment commit to refreshing customer research and buyer personas annually.

If you are performing the customer research yourself, this yearly refresh may take the form of a nice sample size of interviews with your newest customers to evaluate and restudy their buying patterns. The findings should be captured and collected in a consistent way and shared across your teams so they can be operationalized.

2. Know your brand and messaging.

Clearly defined brands are remembered. Think of Apple or IBM: Their iconic branding didn’t pop up overnight. It was clearly defined, consistently presented and intelligently refreshed over time.

Once you know who your ideal customer is, you can use that data to build a strong brand and value proposition that attracts the right audience. Your value proposition is directly tied to the benefit(s) you offer customers and what sets you apart from your competitors. We find that studying buying patterns and asking the right questions about value and differentiation can give you direct insight into how a customer values and speaks about what sets you apart. Then the heavy work becomes storyboarding it and integrating it across your brand and messaging.

3. Keep tabs on your market position.

Anyone can say they’re No. 1 in a product or service category, but can they back it up? Making grand proclamations without supporting data can set your organization up for disappointment. To stay relevant:

• Routinely review competitor strategies.

• Compare your positioning to competitors.

• Identify what makes your organization special.

• Focus on your unique differentiators in messaging.

• Copyright key phrases and language that’s essential to your brand.

• Call out competitors that “borrow” your messaging.

How To Execute Your Marketing Strategy 

Once you understand your customers and have clear branding and messaging and a way to track your market position, you’re ready to go to market. A strong go-to-market strategy should:

• Be multifaceted.

• Tell your story.

• Be scalable.

• Focus on customers.

The Bottom Line: Research First — Or Accept Mediocre Results 

Before investing a dime on any marketing program or content creation, get to know your ideal target customer first. Skipping this essential first step will mean throwing thousands of dollars down the drain.

The companies we see achieving the highest returns on marketing investments spend time on intensive customer and market research to fully understand their customers and prospects before creating a single program or advertisement to try to catch their attention.

The research tools and resources exist to generate holistic buyer personas that will empower your marketing team to craft more powerful and effective campaigns and messages.

It’s simple, really: Either invest the extra time and effort on customer and market research upfront or pay the price later in conversations.

Feature Image Credit: Getty

By

Shannon Prager is President of Leadit Marketing, a marketing and demand gen agency focused on B2B tech and professional services companies. Read Shannon Prager’s full executive profile here.

Sourced from Forbes

By Shannon Prage

John Wanamaker, marketing pioneer of the 19th century, is famously quoted to have said, “Half the money I spend on advertising is wasted; the trouble is I don’t know which half.” Though this statement was made more than 100 years ago, I believe it still rings true for many business-to-business technology companies.

As the founder and president of a B2B marketing firm, I know that unlike Wanamaker, modern companies have advanced marketing automation and analytics platforms at their fingertips. But these platforms alone can’t build a solid strategy. They need input.

Why Marketing Strategy Matters 

In the quest to automate marketing journeys with artificial intelligence and machine learning, it’s easy to overlook the essential element that defines your product or service’s value to the market.

“Marketing strategy” is a loose term few fully understand. It’s not the same as marketing planning or a go-to-market strategy. Let’s define the terms:

• A marketing strategy details a company’s long-term marketing goals and objectives.

• Marketing planning aims to achieve marketing strategy goals with tactical activities and campaigns.

• A go-to-market strategy is the value proposition launched to potential customers. It’s often attached to a company, product or service launch.

The challenge most companies run into, especially in the B2B technology space, is failing to create marketing strategies that are supported by qualitative and quantitative research.

Anyone can write a marketing strategy, but if it’s lacking a clear value proposition based on customer research and buyer personas, it’s unlikely to move your business forward.

Elements Of An Effective Marketing Strategy

The most successful marketing strategies contain three core elements: deep customer knowledge, distinct branding and messaging, and market analysis.

Let’s dig deeper.

1. Understand your customers.

This sounds simple. You probably already have some idea of who your ideal customers are. But do you really know them?

Assuming, rather than asking questions, is where many marketing organizations run into trouble. Quality customer research takes time and needs to be updated a least once per year.

To truly know your customers, you must understand:

• What they want.

• What pains them.

• Where they’re searching for in a solution.

• How to reach them (i.e., content, social media, email, website, etc.).

These dynamics change, and without proper feedback loops, you could miss out on important shifts and opportunities within the marketplace.

At many of the companies we work with, time and resources get in the way of creating and updating effective buyer personas. If companies have them at all, they’re often a few years old and at the bottom of someone’s priority list to update. The companies we see generating the greatest return on investment commit to refreshing customer research and buyer personas annually.

If you are performing the customer research yourself, this yearly refresh may take the form of a nice sample size of interviews with your newest customers to evaluate and restudy their buying patterns. The findings should be captured and collected in a consistent way and shared across your teams so they can be operationalized.

2. Know your brand and messaging.

Clearly defined brands are remembered. Think of Apple or IBM: Their iconic branding didn’t pop up overnight. It was clearly defined, consistently presented and intelligently refreshed over time.

Once you know who your ideal customer is, you can use that data to build a strong brand and value proposition that attracts the right audience. Your value proposition is directly tied to the benefit(s) you offer customers and what sets you apart from your competitors. We find that studying buying patterns and asking the right questions about value and differentiation can give you direct insight into how a customer values and speaks about what sets you apart. Then the heavy work becomes storyboarding it and integrating it across your brand and messaging.

3. Keep tabs on your market position.

Anyone can say they’re No. 1 in a product or service category, but can they back it up? Making grand proclamations without supporting data can set your organization up for disappointment. To stay relevant:

• Routinely review competitor strategies.

• Compare your positioning to competitors.

• Identify what makes your organization special.

• Focus on your unique differentiators in messaging.

• Copyright key phrases and language that’s essential to your brand.

• Call out competitors that “borrow” your messaging.

How To Execute Your Marketing Strategy 

Once you understand your customers and have clear branding and messaging and a way to track your market position, you’re ready to go to market. A strong go-to-market strategy should:

• Be multifaceted.

• Tell your story.

• Be scalable.

• Focus on customers.

The Bottom Line: Research First — Or Accept Mediocre Results 

Before investing a dime on any marketing program or content creation, get to know your ideal target customer first. Skipping this essential first step will mean throwing thousands of dollars down the drain.

The companies we see achieving the highest returns on marketing investments spend time on intensive customer and market research to fully understand their customers and prospects before creating a single program or advertisement to try to catch their attention.

The research tools and resources exist to generate holistic buyer personas that will empower your marketing team to craft more powerful and effective campaigns and messages.

It’s simple, really: Either invest the extra time and effort on customer and market research upfront or pay the price later in conversations.

Feature Image Credit: Getty

By Shannon Prager

Shannon Prager is President of Leadit Marketing, a marketing and demand gen agency focused on B2B tech and professional services companies. Read Shannon Prager’s full executive profile here.

Sourced from Forbes

By Paul Talbot

Marketing strategy works better when it encourages customer retention. Sound strategy can prevent too many resources from being allocated to customer acquisition and focuses marketers on the potentially significant financial benefits of customer retention.

I recently asked Raji Srinivasan, professor of marketing administration and associate dean for diversity and inclusion at the University of Texas McCombs School of Business, for her thoughts on this challenge.

Paul Talbot: What factors should a marketer consider when trying to strike an optimal balance between acquisition and retention?

Raji Srinivasan: The factors a marketer should consider:

  • High cost of acquisition of a customer. Ironically, the higher the cost of acquisition of a customer, the greater the need to focus on retention as a lost customer will be more expensive to re-acquire.
  • Low market share of the marketer. The smaller the market share of the marketer, given a finite set of resources, the greater the need to focus on acquisition of customers.
  • The stickiness of the product. In some technology products, such as software and social networks, there is stickiness in terms of consumer learning and/or social network connectivity. In those cases, it may be wise to invest in customer acquisition to build an installed base of customers, who will benefit by staying with your product.

Talbot: Could situations arise where retention is more profitable for the marketer than acquisition? If so, what would this situation look like?

Srinivasan: Yes, customer retention can be more profitable than customer acquisition. For example, under the following conditions.

  • When there are few customers and they are very expensive to acquire.
  • When the market for your product is shrinking and there may not be a very large number of new prospects in the market.
  • In very price-competitive markets, where there may be a few large marketers.

Talbot: These decisions on allocating resources to both acquisition and retention are partly based on the lifetime value of the customer. But LTV is often an elusive metric, difficult to establish with a strong degree of confidence. How can the process of determining LTV be strengthened, particularly when a brand is new, and metrics are in short supply?

Srinivasan: LTV is most valuable when a brand is new because it can guide the allocation of resources to the ‘right’ customer, one who will offer a strong stream of revenues. The computation of the LTV entails assumptions about:

  • The revenues and costs of serving the customer into the future.
  • The risk profile of the customer and therefore the discount rate for the customer’s cash flows.
  • The retention rate of the customer in the future.

These three factors depend on the firm’s investments in products, technologies, and the customer. There is a potential chicken-and-egg problem here. The LTV estimate depends on the firm’s investments in products, technologies, and customer which, in turn, influence the firm’s investments in its customers. So, this is, undoubtedly, a challenge.

There is a way out. Specifically, after the computation of the LTV of a customer, analysts can model the sensitivity of the LTV of the customer to various assumptions about investments in products, technologies, and the customer. A factor that may be useful here is the marketer’s experience in previous generation products which can provide some guidance for modeling the sensitivity analysis.

Talbot: As the nature of brand loyalty evolves, how does this relate to retention?

Srinivasan: There is a straightforward positive relationship between brand loyalty and retention. Higher brand loyalty will result in higher customer retention and higher positive word of mouth. Interestingly, this will also lower customer acquisition costs. This illustrates the synergistic relationship between customer acquisition and customer retention, specifically, that retention benefits translate into acquisition benefits as well.

Talbot: Any other insights on the role of retention in marketing strategy you’d like to share?

Srinivasan: Ironically, despite the benefits of customer retention which have been touted extensively, some marketers still continue to focus on customer acquisition, ignoring customer retention. This is because of the structure of incentive schemes for sales and new business development teams. Sales and business development executives are compensated only when they acquire new customers not when they work to retain existing customers.

Feature Image Credit: null Getty

 

By Paul Talbot

Minus strategy marketing staggers. I am a somewhat reformed ex-media business executive, with tours of duty at AOL, CBS Radio, and Nationwide Communications. I’m a fan of F. Scott Fitzgerald, the Boston Red Sox, the Principality of Liechtenstein, fried clams, fog, and prices that end in the number 7.

Follow me on Twitter or LinkedIn. Check out my website.

Sourced from Forbes

By

The concept micro-influencer marketing which has recently joined the social media scene, has the same concept as of influencer marketing, but on a smaller scale. This involves developing relationships with influential personalities to promote your brand to the influencer’s audience. But approaching just any influencer won’t drive sales — that requires a strategy.

For many businesses, especially small and medium-sized ones, influencer marketing seems challenging because of the high costs involved. However, this is not the only way you can market your brand. If you can’t afford the thousands of dollars charged for a single Instagram post, you can always count on micro-influencers.

Just as the name suggests, they are influencers with a smaller audience base that range between 1000-100,000 followers on their social media profiles. The number of followers shouldn’t matter compared to what these types of influencers have to offer. Their small followers make it possible for them to engage with them directly unlike influencers with a large following.

How can you develop your marketing strategy using micro-influencers? Here are 5 tips to get you started.

1. Turn micro-influential fans to brand advocates

Influencers who already love your brand are the best type to select. If you are developing a marketing strategy and want to reap the benefits of micro-influencers, look no further than that everyday consumer who has at least 1000 followers.

It will be very easy to convince such a fan to be your brand advocate. Offering them a discount or a free product can be enough to convince them to represent your brand on social platforms. The best part is that micro influential fans are more relatable to customers than celebrities and influencers with millions of followers.

Recommended: 6 Secrets to Getting a Social Influencer’s Attention

You can get started on this by monitoring your brand mentions on social media. There are many tools that you can use for social listening. You will be surprised at the long list of influential fans who are always talking about you. Use them to promote your brand among their hyper-engaged audiences.

Alternatively, you can turn that consumer who regularly interacts with your business on social media to be your brand advocate as they do on Glossier.

2. Tap into storytelling

If you have reached this far with your social media marketing strategy, probably you have come to the realization that using still photos of your product is not getting you the traffic you want to get. Instead, have your micro-influencers tell the story.

Storytelling is a powerful tool that makes potential customers associate your business with something they can relate. It taps into emotions, thus encouraging potential customers to take action. Use the superpower of stories.

Encourage your micro-influencers to tell flesh and unique stories about your brand in their own voice. Let them share their own experiences or personal stories as a testimony that relates to your brand. Such narratives resonate well with your target audience since they are relatable. Make the stories believable to gain more attention and credibility.

3. Set up a long-term campaign

In marketing campaigns, one is never enough. If your goal is to promote your brand, a one-off influencer campaign is not enough to gain your brand awareness you need. Unless you are promoting the launch of a new product, you will need to be consistent with your campaigns. Ensure the influencer posts regularly in the appropriate times and at reasonable intervals.

Hire micro-influencers on a long-term basis. When the influencer talks about your product for a long period, your target audience absorbs more information about the brand from them. It will sink in their mind better and promote brand recall as well as recognition.

Give the micro-influencers a long term contract. If it expires, renew it again for as long as they are interested. A study by Experticity found out that 82% of customers are more likely to follow recommendations made by a micro-Influencer.

4. Have your micro-influencers’ content reviewed and optimized

The effectiveness of an influencer’s content comes from how original, authentic, and natural it is. That is how they manage to get a large following on their social media profiles. Content is the king. As a brand, you have a responsibility to ensure the content posted by your micro-influencers aligns with your marketing goals and values.

With this, your brand becomes visible on other online sites that you might have never gotten an audience. You can join forces with the micro-influencers by reviewing their content before they post.

Promote such content by sharing it on your online platforms. The influencer should also return the favor by promoting your content in their profiles. However, this should be done in a smart way to avoid losing the authenticity of your micro-influencers‘ content.

5. Measure the effectiveness of the micro-influencers in real-time

Don’t use micro-Influencers in your marketing strategy with no purpose. Like any other marketing strategy, you should measure their performance using the key metrics.

You will get to know where your micro-influencers campaign strategy is working and where to put more effort. There are various tools you can use to get real-time analysis of engagement and click-through rates. You will in return increase your ROI.

Bottom line:

If you are still not utilizing influencer marketing due to the thousands of dollars you will need to invest, you are losing out on a lot. Micro-Influencers are out there promoting your competitors’ brands effectively and at very friendly rates.

With the above useful tips, you will get ahead of the game and reap the benefits of using micro-influencers. You will enjoy watching your brands’ engagement rates and conversations skyrocket. What are you waiting for? Start using micro-influencers for your marketing strategy today!

By

Kevin Whalez is a marketing specialist, business consultant, and psychologist, who investigates how to make people and organizations more effective. He is passionate about leveraging the right strategic partnerships and scaling your online influence. He is a regular contributor to PotencyUP website, as well as to various marketing and business related resources.

Sourced from The Next Scoop

By Benjamin Herrmann

Customer trust and brand loyalty are inextricably linked, essential to long-term business success, and tougher than ever to gain and retain. With all the breaches, hacks, and misuses of customer data in recent years, customer trust is low. And with the proliferation of digital channels making upstart competitors a mere millisecond-click away, loyalty is precarious, as well.

This reality, along with digital channels becoming the norm in buying from and interacting with both B2C and B2B customers, means that it’s mission critical to reshape the way you’re building customer trust. In the digital landscape, brands need to focus on tapping into the right customer data in a way that is mindful and doesn’t cross boundaries of privacy, while also prioritizing transparency and individualized support tailored to each customer.

Here are three best practices you can use in your marketing strategies to build customer trust and lasting loyalty in the digital age.

1. Respect privacy and avoid “creepiness” when personalizing experiences

“Customers are done with creepy; don’t be creepy,” Alex Atzberger, president of SAP customer experience, said at the 2018 SAPPHIRE NOW conference. “Without consent, don’t personalize.” He couldn’t have been more right.

Personalization plays a major role in thoughtfully engaging customers, but when it isn’t handled with care, brands can lose favor with customers who suspect their privacy isn’t being prioritized. New laws around data governance, such as GDPR and the California Consumer Privacy Act, help give customers an extra layer of security, but the responsibility still lies with brands to create personalized experiences without being creepy or crossing any lines with the consumer.

The challenge is that we have access to more data than ever, especially customer data around specific behaviors and preferences. It’s natural as a brand to want to make use of any and all data you can access to create a better user experience, but respecting customer privacy must be the top priority. Plus, the better results will come from identifying and acting on the right data, rather than trying to make everything you can get your hands on into something actionable.

Mastering personalization is about showing each individual customer that you’re committed to and respect the relationship they have with your brand.

2. Maintain transparency and keep it consistent across your organization

Transparency should span across every aspect of business, but when it comes to building digital trust with your customers, price transparency is always an important practice. It supports a connected customer experience, adding long-term value by giving your customers the ability to explore pricing options before making purchasing decisions. Be upfront about costs throughout the buyer journey (e.g., taxes, service fees), so customers aren’t seeing them only at the end when it’s time to make a purchase. This way your customers can understand exactly what they’ll be buying and for how much before heading into the final transaction.

Giving your customers trial periods with products also plays an important role in transparency. Many consumer products are set up in this way, from cars to clothing to even food – these items are set out in a way that lets customers view them and try them before they buy. Apply the same principle to B2B products, such as software.

When implementing digital purchasing options into your customer journey, always include trial options. Your customers can use this opportunity to properly evaluate whether or not a product meets the challenges or needs they are seeking to address without needing to make a purchase first. They can then make better, more confident purchasing decisions, which also supports long-lasting trust in your brand.

3. Be helpful along the entire customer journey

Support – especially with digital sales that lacks face-to-face interaction with a sales or service representative – should always be ready and available before, during, and after purchases are made. Customer service takes many shapes: sometimes it’s in-person, other times it’s over the phone or via online chat, and sometimes it’s simply in the background, providing support without the customer realizing it’s there.

B2C companies already focus on support as part of the entire customer journey and experience, infusing the same customer support systems they have in person into their digital platforms. This is a model that B2B companies can use for digital sales and e-commerce, as well. In fact, B2B brands should be held to a higher standard in supplying customer support from a digital perspective, as these customers are used to the high-touch services of a vendor’s field sales team.

Even though your customers want quicker, more seamless online options, you shouldn’t let service levels drop because the customer is no longer working with someone directly. Your customers will still expect your guidance and support throughout their digital journey, through the transaction process and beyond. It’s important to show your customers your commitment to their experience along this path, allowing trust to take shape as you do this.

Customer trust is gained – and kept – by aligning goals. Your customer’s goal is to solve a problem, improve a process, transform their business, etc., and your top goal should always be to support customers along their path to achieving their goals. There isn’t a one-size-fits-all solution to building trust, especially in digital interactions, but incorporating these best practices into your overall marketing strategy is a great starting point.

By Benjamin Herrmann

Connect with Benjamin Herrmann at @bherrmann81 and on LinkedIn.

As head of digital commerce for SAP, Benjamin Herrmann is responsible for developing the digital direct sales channel at SAP across products, professional services, and education. Dedicated to helping customers become best-run businesses, Herrmann has established himself as a leader in B2B digital business models. Prior to his current role, Herrmann was senior director of strategy for SAP Portfolio & Pricing, where he ran board-level change programs. He also worked as an enterprise business architect and lead business architect in the Business Transformation Office for PricewaterhouseCoopers, and served as a lecturer on Information Systems at the Frankfurt School of Finance and Management.

Sourced from D!gitalist

By

Your video content proves your work dynamically, hence it should be a priority to make sure it’s well produced and adds to your marketing strategy.

Producing engaging video content for your business can widen your customer and audience reach. If done right, it serves as an effective marketing tool to enhance your brand’s market presence. Your video content proves your work dynamically, hence it should be a priority to make sure it’s well produced and adds to your marketing strategy. Here are five mistakes that companies often make when they go about creating video content:

1. Producing poor quality video The days of relying on your phone and producing a shaky poor quality video in the name of “authenticity” are gone. The audience now expects a more polished viewing experience. Don’t forget that your video content is an extension of your brand. Produce a poor quality video, and the audience will start to believe you are promoting a poor quality service or product. Perception is reality.

2. Ignoring the importance of sound Audio comprises 50% of your viewing experience. Poor audio can result in your audience giving up on watching the video all together. Make sure to pay attention if filming in public areas. Can an alternate location be used? Is it time to invest in a microphone to ensure smooth sound? The answer is, probably, yes!

3. Over-selling Companies need to remember that viewers tune into video content online to be informed or entertained, not to be sold to. Companies that force their brand and product throughout their video content are unlikely to see the ROI that they need. The most googled terms are “how to” and “how do I,” which means your video content will have the highest engagement if it is answering a question and providing knowledge, as opposed to directly promoting your services.

4. Expecting too much from one video This is when you believe you’ve produced one great video, and you don’t understand why sales haven’t flooded in. Like with most things, this takes time, and video content needs a consistent strategy. It can take 2-3 months to start to see an uptake in your video content. The more visible you are, coupled with the more knowledge you share, will ensure that when clients are ready to pay for your service, since you are at the forefront of their mind.

5. Talking about everything you do in one long video Your video content should never feel like a shopping list. This is not an opportunity to talk about everything you do in one video. A better strategy would be to create shorter 30 second to one-minute videos, each focused on one topic. The average audience online retention is currently at one minute and 40 seconds, and it is consistently getting shorter. That coupled with the optimum durations for different platforms means that in most cases, 30 seconds to one minute and 30 seconds is sufficient to get your message across.

This article was developed in collaboration with Young Arab Leaders (YAL), a pan-Arab, non-profit organization that seeks to promote modern leadership and entrepreneurship among Arab youth, men and women, with a view to improving the socio-economic situation in the Arab world.

As a YAL member, Reim El Houni notes that the caliber of events she has attended with the organization has been unmatched. “They provide exclusive opportunities for members to get up close and personal with some of the UAE’s most influential businesswomen and men, offering insight into industries that you may not normally be exposed to,” El Houni says. “Their events are exclusive and highly curated and are always worth the time investment. Whether it’s their Power Lunches, or their Executive Meetups, you’re guaranteed to walk away with a new perspective and insight into the world of business.”

To learn more about YAL and be a part of its network, check out yaleaders.org

Feature Image Credit: Shutterstock 

By

CEO, Ti22 Films, dubai ON demand, Fusion Digital Content

Sourced from Entrepreneur Middle East