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By Kanishka Kumawat

Strategies for Achieving Higher Conversions and Better ROI

No matter how you plan your email marketing strategy, the goal is always the same– driving results.

The only way to know the effectiveness of your strategy is by measuring your conversion rates. They are paramount for achieving the results you want while nurturing a strong community.

Driving sales and revenue are the insights that impact the bottom line of your marketing strategy. They tell you if you are making an impact on your audience and inspiring action.

If you want to understand how to master conversion rates and optimize them to your needs, here are some of the best practices and real case studies that will help you stay on top of the game.

Table of Contents

Introduction to Email Marketing Conversion Rates

Email marketing conversion rates are the direct indicator of your influence on your audience.

They help you understand the percentage of your audience engaging with your content and ultimately being driven to take action — whether that is making a purchase, downloading a PDF, or using a discount code.

Once you optimize this element, you can gauge your campaigns effectively and achieve your desired results.

For example, you can track the number of clicks, impressions, and conversions generated by your campaigns. You can also track the cost per click (CPC), cost per impression (CPM), and return on investment (ROI) of your campaigns.

What Are Email Marketing Conversion Rates?

Say you’re running an email campaign to showcase your new digital product. The conversion rate will show you the percentage of people who not only clicked on that product link in your email but also went ahead and bought it.

A high conversion rate signals that your content resonates with your audience, your Call-to-Action (CTA) is driving results, and your campaign is casting spells of success left and right!

Importance of Tracking and Analysing Conversion Rates in Email Marketing

Understanding Email Marketing Conversion Rates

Tracking and analysing conversion rates in email marketing form the bedrock of success.

Here are five reasons why these are not mere numbers but indispensable metrics that hold the power to optimize your marketing strategy:

Performance Evaluation: At the heart of every email campaign is the desire to see results. By understanding which aspects of your emails contribute to higher conversion rates, you can optimize your content, design, calls-to-action, and targeting to improve your campaign’s performance.

Optimization Opportunities: When you analyse your conversion rates you can identify pain points and areas for optimization. Constant iteration is the key to growth and your conversation rates will point to the aspects where you are lagging.

Return on Investment (ROI): The effort and time you invest in your marketing campaigns should translate into a measurable ROI. This is the metric that tells you how effective your work has been.

Segment and Target: Personalization is the key to winning people. Analyse different segments of your email list to understand specific audience preferences. In doing this, your campaigns will resonate with your audience on a personal level and induce higher conversion rates.

Test and Iterate: By conducting A/B tests and experimenting with your subject lines, CTAs, or content, you can pinpoint what resonates best with your audience. Constant iteration and testing allows you to produce highly refined content and enhance campaign performance.

Understanding Average Email Marketing Conversion Rates

Average email marketing conversion rates provide insights into building successful email campaigns. By analysing these rates, businesses can optimize their strategies and achieve better results.

These are the benchmark metrics that reveal the average conversion rates across different niches. This empowers you to fine-tune your strategies, optimize your content, and achieve better results in engaging and persuading your audience.

Factors That Influence Average Conversion Rates

From Sender Reputation to your landing page, many factors dictate your conversion rate. Here are some of the five factors that you can work on starting today:

Call-to-Action (CTA): A clear and compelling CTA can work wonders. This is what inspires people to take action. Example – Sunlighter’s CTA for referrals.

Understanding Email Marketing Conversion Rates

Email Design and Layout: First impressions matter, and your email design can make or break it. Your email layout will enhance your subscribers’ experience and boost interaction. Example – Milk Road’s UI

Understanding Email Marketing Conversion Rates

Personalization and Segmentation: Generic emails are a thing of the past. Successful marketing is not about selling products– it’s about seeing and understanding people and embracing their needs.

That’s why personalized emails that address people by their names will garner a stronger community.

Timing and Frequency: The right timing can make all the difference. Avoid overwhelming your subscribers with excessive emails to yield better results. This is where you can set a schedule for yourself. Example – “5-Bullet Friday” by Tim Ferriss is a weekly email newsletter where he shares five handpicked recommendations related to tools, books, articles, gadgets, and more that he’s found valuable.

Why Trust me: I earned my audience’s trust by regularly sharing a video series called Half Baked on Instagram every Saturday, which received 27,683 views back in 2020. The audience became familiar with the content and eagerly awaited its release at 8 PM each Saturday.

Reputation and Trustworthiness: Trust is the currency of email marketing. Being transparent with your content and thoughts will make you more relatable to your audience and build a sense of trust. Example- Home screen’s home page.

Understanding Email Marketing Conversion Rates

Conversion Rate Optimization (CRO) Techniques

Conversion rate optimization (CRO) is the process of improving the conversion rates of your email campaigns. The goal is to make an impact on people and build trust. Building credibility takes a long time, but when done right, it has a high ROI.

Five effective CRO techniques to enhance your email marketing conversion rates:

Understanding Email Marketing Conversion Rates

A/B Testing: Experiment with elements like subject lines, CTA buttons, layout, and images to test what your audience loves the most about your emails. Test-iterate-repeat.

Clear and Compelling CTAs: Your CTA will guide the subscribers to take action. It has to be concise and persuasive which builds transparency.

Example – “I’d love to hear from you. What are you building right now and what are you struggling with? Reply to this email, I’d love to know!”

Mobile Optimization: Most people check their emails on their phones. Mobile-responsive emails will cater to their needs. With beehiiv, you can design your emails for PC and mobile with the same ease.

Landing Page Optimization: Create relevant and optimized landing pages that align with the email content and make it easy for the readers to say “yes”.

Use of Visuals: Incorporate relevant images and videos to make the email content more engaging and impactful. A balance of text and visuals is necessary.

Benchmarks and Industry Standards for Average Conversion Rates

Industries with direct sales and immediate purchase opportunities, such as e-commerce and retail, boast higher average conversion rates. Customers in these sectors often make a purchase, leading to quicker actions and higher conversions.

While industries focusing on lead generation may experience lower conversion rates. The desired action in these cases involves a more extensive decision-making process, resulting in a longer sales funnel.

Take a look at the average conversion rates we noticed at beehiiv in 2023:

Understanding Email Marketing Conversion Rates

Key Metrics for Evaluating Email Marketing Conversion Rates

Thankfully, tracking the performance of email marketing is fairly straightforward. The majority of email marketing services come equipped with built-in analytics tools that enable you to monitor and comprehend the effectiveness of your email campaigns.

By measuring key metrics like open rates, click-through rates, and conversion rates, you gain valuable insights into what is effective, and what is not, and, most crucially, how to refine your future emails for better results.

Click-Through Rates (CTR) And Its Relationship to Conversion Rates

Understanding Email Marketing Conversion Rates

Click-through rate (CTR) is calculated by dividing the number of unique clicks by the number of delivered emails and multiplying it by 100.

It is closely related to conversion rates because it signifies the initial interest and interaction of your subscribers with the email campaign. A higher CTR indicates that more readers found the email content compelling and took the next step by clicking on the CTA or link.

This active engagement is a crucial precursor to achieving conversions.

Open Rates and Their Impact on Conversion Rates

Open rates measure the percentage of subscribers who opened an email compared to the total number of delivered emails. Open rates are influenced by:

  • Subject lines
  • Sender name
  • Preview text

While open rates indicate that the email caught the recipient’s attention enough to open it, they do not directly correlate with conversions. Some subscribers might open an email out of curiosity or interest but not proceed with the desired action. When the open rate is combined with KPIs like CTR, you can gain a comprehensive understanding of email campaign performance.

The relationship between open rates and conversion rates lies in the recipient’s initial interest and engagement. A well-crafted subject line and compelling email content can entice recipients to open the email and explore further. Subsequently, the content’s relevancy and the effectiveness of the CTA play a crucial role in driving recipients toward taking the desired action and achieving conversions.

How To Determine Conversion Rates in Email Marketing

With email platforms like beehiiv, you don’t need to calculate your campaign conversion rates as you can easily get the analytics report which shows you the performance, sources, etc.

beehiiv’s analytics go beyond simple numbers. You can dig deeper into the sources of your conversions, understanding which emails or segments are driving the most significant results. This empowers you to optimize your content and targeting, tailoring your campaigns for maximum impact.

Calculation Formula for Conversion Rates

Conversion rate is the percentage of subscribers who either complete the desired action or become customers, depending on your conversion goal.

Understanding Email Marketing Conversion Rates

Conversion Rate (%) = x number of signups or purchases / x number of Delivered Emails X 100

To calculate the conversion rate, follow these steps:

Track and count the number of recipients who completed the desired action (e.g., signed up, made a purchase) as a result of the email campaign. This number will be the numerator in the formula.

Calculate the total number of delivered emails. This includes emails that were not bounced or marked as spam. This number will be the denominator in the formula.

For example, if an email campaign resulted in 200 signups and there were 10,000 delivered emails, the conversion rate would be:

Conversion Rate (%) = (200 / 10,000) * 100 = 2%

This means that the email campaign achieved a 2% conversion rate, with 2% of recipients completing the desired action of signing up.

Tracking Conversions and Attributing Them To Specific Email Campaigns

Tracking conversions is a crucial aspect of email marketing to measure the effectiveness of campaigns and understand audience behaviour. To track conversions and attribute them to specific email campaigns, you can use specialized tools and techniques:

Unique URLs or UTM Parameters: Create unique URLs or add UTM parameters to the links in your email campaigns. These parameters help identify the source of traffic and track conversions from specific emails.

Conversion Tracking Pixels: Use tracking pixels or codes placed on the conversion page (e.g., thank you page after signing up). When your potential subscribers reach this page after clicking the CTA, the pixel fires and the conversion is recorded.

ESP: Your ESP will help you with insights and analytics by giving you an in-depth look into the actions taken by people on your email. Using a good emailing platform can not only affect your conversion rates but also your deliverability– so that you don’t end up in your subscribers’ spam folders!

Tools and Software for Measuring Conversion Rates

As the times have changed, you don’t have to worry about manually tracking your open rates or checking your web views. There are so many tools out there that can help you measure your conversion rates without any hassle, but these two are the best:

Google Analytics: Not only is google analytics free, but is also the top tool that people use to get detailed insights on their campaign performances.

beehiiv: Your emailing and analytical partner. With beehiiv you can track your performance, automate your campaigns and get 3D analytics that help you level up your marketing strategy.

Understanding Email Marketing Conversion Rates

Strategies for Improving Conversion Rates in Email Marketing

There are many ways to improve your email marketing strategy and some of them can be as simple as making changes to the way you write your subject lines. These strategies work because they are grounded in understanding and catering to the needs of your audience.

Your subject lines and CTAs are the connections you build with your readers at first glance.

Crafting Compelling Subject Lines and Email Content

The first step in building your email list is getting people to subscribe to your newsletter. The next step in that ladder is them opening your emails. Your subject line is what they see first to help them determine whether the email is worth their time and interest.

They are the gateway to engagement. Approximately 47% of users open emails based on the subject line. Craft compelling subject lines that pique curiosity and drive recipients to open your email. This will increase your email open rates.

To Create Subject Lines That Truly Stand Out, Consider the Following Tips:

Be clear and concise: Keep your subject lines concise and to the point. Avoid being vague or misleading, as your subscribers might feel deceived and mark your emails as spam.

Understanding Email Marketing Conversion Rates

Personalization: The psychology behind mentioning someone’s name in an email is rooted in a cognitive bias known as the “name-personalization effect.” This effect is a result of the brain’s automatic attention to self-relevant information, which is part of our natural social cognition.

Create a sense of urgency: Incorporate words that create a sense of urgency or exclusivity to encourage immediate action. The best example of this is “limited-time deal” offers that brands push forward during their sales.

Pique curiosity: Spark curiosity by using intriguing questions or teasing snippets of valuable content. When you give people a sneak peek into your content, it channels them to open your email and get the details.

Understanding Email Marketing Conversion Rates

Emphasize benefits: Highlight the benefits or value of opening the email. Ask yourself– “What value are my readers going to get after reading my mail?” and tell them about the same.

Understanding Email Marketing Conversion Rates

A/B testing and Optimization

A/B testing is a technique that allows you to experiment with different variations of your emails and subject lines to determine which performs best.

By splitting your email list into two groups and sending different versions of your subject lines or email content to each, you can assess which version yields higher engagement and conversion rates.

Here’s how to conduct effective A/B testing:

Choose one variable: Focus on testing one element at a time to accurately measure its impact. For example, test different subject lines while keeping the email content the same.

Segment your list: Divide your email list into two equal segments randomly.

Test and analyse: Send version A to one segment and version B to the other. Monitor the results and analyse the performance of each variant.

Implement the best-performing version: Based on the results, choose the winning version and implement it in your future campaigns.

Utilizing Persuasive Copywriting Techniques

Compelling email content is the driving force behind conversions. Persuasive copywriting techniques help influence recipients’ decisions and prompt them to take the desired action.

Here are some persuasive copywriting tips for email content:

Know your audience: Understand your target audience’s pain points, desires, and motivations. Tailor your content to resonate with their needs.

Understanding Email Marketing Conversion Rates

Address benefits not features: Communicate how your product or service benefits your audience and solves their problems. The more niche it is, the better. Example – A newsletter for Product Managers– you don’t have to have 100k subscribers, even 10k people can build a strong community.

Use storytelling: Weave engaging stories that connect emotionally with readers and make your message memorable. It could be real-life incidents or pop-culture inspired.

Write action-oriented CTAs: Use strong and clear calls-to-action that encourage your subscribers to act immediately.

Use power words: Incorporate powerful words that evoke emotions and captivate attention. Keep editing your email copy until you feel satisfied. When you feel like you’re done, go through your copy as a reader to get a different perspective.

Real-World Examples of High-Converting Emails

From big businesses like Airbnb and Uber to creators, high converting emails are not that difficult to figure out, all that it takes is an understanding of consumer psychology.

Here’s a breakdown of one of the best emails by Michael Houck:

  • Talking about the Top 1% (who doesn’t want to be there?) and sharing his key learnings from people like Ben Horowitz and Matt Mochary.
  • Mentioning the new things he has been working on, which keeps his subscribers eager to know more.
  • Giving social proof. “Promote your startup to 14000+ founders”
  • Reading time – 5 mins. He’s not asking for a lot of commitment from me, it is an easy ask.
Understanding Email Marketing Conversion Rates

Here’s how Superhuman AI did the same!

  • Subscriber count doesn’t always determine success. In specific niches, like a private equity newsletter with 2,000 senior manager readers, the value of the audience matters more. Even with a smaller subscriber base, sponsors may pay generously for ads as a result of the highly targeted audience.
  • Mastering writing is akin to exercising—results don’t come overnight. Quantity leads to quality and consistent action is key. It wasn’t easy at the start, but it is all about putting in more reps. Success comes from learning through continuous practice and experimentation.
Understanding Email Marketing Conversion Rates

Tracking and Analysing Email Marketing Conversion Rates

Your first campaign might not give you the best results and that’s a part of the process. You need to write what people want to read. Having an audience-first approach is what always works.

The more you experiment, the better understanding you will get out of your audience’s expectations. When you realize what works, double down on that!

You can start by trying out different content types, themes, or storytelling approaches that consistently capture your audience’s attention. Continuously adapting and optimizing based on your learnings leads to a stronger alignment between your email content and your audience’s desires.

Regularly analyse these performance metrics and make data-driven improvements to your email campaigns:

Click-Through Rate (CTR): Track the percentage of recipients who clicked on the links or CTAs in the email.

Open Rate: Monitor the percentage of recipients who opened the email.

Bounce Rate: Keep an eye on the percentage of emails that were not successfully delivered due to invalid email addresses or other issues.

Unsubscribe Rate: Monitor the percentage of recipients who opted out of your email list.Test different subject lines, CTAs, content, and design elements to identify what resonates best with your audience.

Best Practices for Achieving Higher Conversion Rates in Email Marketing

Achieving higher conversion rates is not rocket science, rather it is just about three main things:

1. Building a Responsive Email List

A responsive list consists of engaged subscribers who are genuinely interested in your content, products, or services. Here are some tips to build and maintain a responsive email list:

a. Use double opt-in: Implement a double opt-in process to confirm subscribers’ interest and ensure they willingly subscribe to your emails.

b. Offer valuable incentives: Provide valuable incentives such as exclusive content, discounts, or free resources to encourage sign-ups.

e. Regularly clean and update your list: Remove inactive or unengaged subscribers to maintain list quality and improve deliverability rates.

2. Email Segmentation and Targeting Strategies

Segmenting your email list allows you to deliver targeted messages tailored to specific groups. This also gives you insights on what you need to focus more on and who your most engaged subscribers are.

This level of personalization not only increases the relevance of your emails but also enhances engagement and conversion rates. It allows you to speak directly to the interests and pain points of each segment, making your communications more meaningful and effective.

Here’s how to use email segmentation effectively:

a. Demographic segmentation: Divide your list based on demographic data such as age, gender, location, or job title.

b. Behavioural segmentation: Segment subscribers based on their interactions with your emails, website, or previous purchases.

c. Interest-based segmentation: Group subscribers with similar interests or preferences to deliver content that aligns with their needs.

d. Buyer journey segmentation: Tailor emails based on where subscribers are in the buyers’ journey to nurture leads effectively.

3. Deliverability and Email Reputation Management

Ensuring your emails reach the recipients’ inboxes and avoiding the spam folder is crucial for email marketing success. Follow these practices to maintain a positive email reputation:

a. Authenticate your emails: Use DomainKeys Identified Mail (DKIM) and Sender Policy Framework (SPF) to authenticate your emails and prove their legitimacy.

b. Monitor engagement metrics: Keep a close eye on open rates, click-through rates, and spam complaints to measure email engagement.

c. Avoid spam traps: Regularly clean your email list to remove inactive and invalid email addresses that may become spam traps.

d. Provide clear unsubscribe options: Make it easy for subscribers to opt-out if they wish, as this can reduce the likelihood of spam and also boost your deliverability.

e. Comply with anti-spam laws: Familiarize yourself with anti-spam regulations like the CAN-SPAM Act and GDPR to ensure compliance.

Lessons Learned From Successful Conversion Rate Optimization Strategies

The best way to build an audience through email marketing is by a blend of sharing what you know best and what people won’t find anywhere else.

This connection forms the foundation upon which you can build lasting relationships and foster trust. Sharing your specialized knowledge not only positions you as a credible source but also showcases your commitment to providing real value to your audience.

Here are three key takeaways from this blog that you can put into action starting today:

Understanding Email Marketing Conversion Rates

Personalization matters: Personalized emails that cater to individual interests and preferences drive higher engagement and conversions.

A/B testing is key: Continuously test different elements in your emails to discover what resonates best with your audience.

Relevancy increases conversions: Sending targeted and relevant content based on segmentation leads to improved conversion rates.

Your emailing platform can make or break the game, choosing beehiiv will not only help you dodge the spam folders of your subscribers but also give you support in case you feel stuck.

Start emailing today, and join the hive!

By Kanishka Kumawat

Sourced from beehiiv Blog

Sourced from Forbes

Whether it’s from their favourite store, a service they use or perhaps a local non-profit they follow, people are likely being sent multiple email marketing messages every day.

And as one of the most popular forms of marketing, email marketing can be highly effective in generating sales and increasing brand engagement.

But not every email is created equal. To entice someone to click on your email and then engage, you’ll need to be intentional with its content and design. According to the communications and marketing leaders of Forbes Communications Council, implementing at least one of the following nine elements is a good place to start. Below are some of the most innovative email marketing campaigns these experts have experienced or seen, and why they think the inclusion of these elements was such an effective approach.

1. Digestible Summaries With In-Depth Options

The best email marketing campaign I’ve ever seen was by two separate companies that had their whole business model built around newsletters. They took the news in a particular industry for the day and transformed it into a list of headlines that were categorized vertically. They understood that useful newsletters provide digestible summaries of the market with the option to deep-dive on topics. – Alfie Dawson, Bordeaux & Burgundy

2. A Highly Personalized Experience

Stanley Black & Decker has won our household loyalty with expertly tailored emails. For example, the notes I receive are sent in the evening, written in my mother tongue (Spanish) and showcase product recommendations and imagery aligned with my love for small home projects. Meanwhile, my husband receives an entirely different email experience. This thoughtful approach keeps us deeply engaged. – Adriana Gil Miner, Iterable

3. A Seemingly Counterintuitive Theme

Patagonia launched a campaign, “Don’t Buy This Jacket,” which encouraged customers to think twice before buying another jacket. It was focused on environmental responsibility and mindful purchasing. The result wasn’t massive sales, but it received positive media coverage and brand awareness. Brilliant! – Cade Collister, Metova

4. Effective AI Implementation

I’ve received personalized videos thanks to AI. I had a brand send me a personalized lead generation email, which allowed me to schedule a consultation. When I scheduled the appointment, a personalized video gave me a step-by-step process to prepare for the video appointment. Then, after the video, it gave me a recap and a “thank you.” – Ken Louie, MetroPlusHealth

5. Ongoing Tasks That Prompt User Engagement

One good example is a multi-week email sequence that presented a new product task for customers to complete each week. The progression gently nudged users from onboarding to feature exploration to product stickiness. Tasks and sequencing were based on usage data from existing satisfied customers, and the goal was reducing time to value—a simple concept based on a deep understanding of customer behaviour and value. – Rekha Thomas, Path Forward Marketing LLC

6. The ‘Nine-Word Email’

The most effective email campaigns are the ones that, ironically, look like normal emails with no design. The nine-word email campaign mimics the phrasing of an executive, so it works extremely well in gaining responses from decision makers. In addition, avoiding images creates the illusion that the email has been sent in a one-to-one manner rather than one-to-many, making it feel more personalized. – Patrick Ward, Formula.Monks

7. Stories Mixed With ‘Why I Need It Now’

Mixing helpful storytelling content with “why I need it now” content tends to work. Recently, I received an email with a video in it that was pretty powerful. As always, if it is not opened by a human, it doesn’t matter. Focus on personalization and the subject line—I often add the “group” in as well. It is time consuming, but at mid to end of funnel, that is where to put the time in. – Mollie Barnett, The SMART Co.

8. Free Value

The best email marketing campaigns have one thing in common: free value. They deliver information via a mini-workshop, a video series, downloadable PDFs, templates and more. When the recipient opens an email in the campaign, they not only get tremendous value at no cost but also an understanding of the particular benefit the product or service provides. – Melissa Kandel, little word studio

9. Customized Recommendations

Netflix’s recommendation emails utilize personalization that goes beyond using your name; they analyze the shows you watch and create tailored emails with suggestions you’re likely to love. This approach is effective because it adds value to every email and compels you to click. You can adopt a similar approach by tracking on-site activity or purchases and sending customized product recommendations. – Maria Amalia Rojas, Nord Comms

Check out my website.

Feature Image Credit: GETTY

Sourced from Forbes

Communications, PR, public affairs & media relations executives from Forbes Communications Council share first-hand insights.

By Chad S. White

Six of my favourite quotes along with the wisdom I see in them.

The Gist

  • Regulatory expectations. Laws protect businesses, but meeting customer expectations is crucial.
  • Audience acquisition. Choose the right customers for genuine engagement and reduced bounce rates.
  • Trust building. Avoid vague emails; clarity brings conversions and maintains subscriber trust.

In the new fourth edition of my book, “Email Marketing Rules,” I include quotes from scores of experts who have impacted how I think about the email channel, as well as about marketing in general. Here, I’d like to share six of my favorite quotes along with the wisdom I see in them. In no particular order, here they are …

Where Law Meets Emails and Consumers

“The law is the low bar.”

— Laura Atkins, owner of Word to the Wise

Most businesses are intrinsically against any new laws or regulations, which invariably introduce additional compliance costs or restrict business practices. Canada’s Anti-Spam Legislation (CASL), the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) and other privacy and anti-spam laws have undeniably done both of those.

However, I would argue that these laws have actually protected businesses and the email channel. The truth is the law always lags consumer expectations, as well as the expectations of inbox providers in the case of anti-spam laws. And a growing gap in expectations is a growing risk to businesses in terms of customer loyalty and brand image and reputation.

This danger is most evident in the US, where the CAN-SPAM Act of 2003 is still sadly in effect. In this country, merely complying with CAN-SPAM would be disastrous, leading to block listings and wholesale junking and blocking of campaigns by inbox providers. As Laura says, our subscribers expect much more from us. At a minimum, they expect us to respect their permission, both in terms of opt-ins and in terms of responding to their inactivity by eventually suppressing future emails to them.

Quality Customers and Quality Emails

“Customer loyalty is mostly about choosing the right customers.”

— John Jantsch, author of “Duct Tape Marketing

Where you acquire new subscribers almost predetermines whether your email program will struggle or thrive. If you acquire many of your subscribers through list purchases, poorly done list rentals, sweepstakes and other sources that are far from your business operations, then you’ll be plagued by high bounce rates, low engagement and high spam complaints.

On the other hand, if you’re gaining the vast majority of your subscribers via signups during your online or in-store checkout processes, on your website and in your app, then you will have added lots of customers to your list who are genuine fans that are predisposed to engage with your emails and buy again.

If you’re unsure how your audience acquisition sources are affecting your overall email program health, then start tagging your sources so you can track the behaviours of the subscribers that come onto your list from each one. Chances are you’ll find that one or two of your acquisition sources are responsible for the majority of your bounces, inactivity and complaints.

Avoid Baiting Subject Lines for Open Rates

“Don’t confuse attention for intent.”

— John Bonini, founder of Some Good Content

Too many email marketers still believe that the key to getting more conversions is to get more opens. After all, a subscriber can’t convert if they don’t open the email, they reason.

In the pursuit of high open rates, these marketers often use vague and cryptic subject lines and preview text — often defending their use as being “clever” or in service of creating a “curiosity gap.” However, these open-bait tactics only succeed in attracting curious subscribers rather than ones who are actually interested in the email’s call-to-action. Not only does this result in low click-to-open rates, but open rates eventually decline over time as subscribers end up repeatedly feeling like their time was wasted reading messages they ended up having little interest in.

 

In these cases, the marketer has sacrificed subscriber trust in exchange for getting additional opens that rarely drove business goals. The wiser path is to respect your subscribers’ time by using envelope content that reflects the content of the email. Long-term, this results in higher total opens, as well as more conversions and less list churn as your openers will have stronger intent.

While John was talking about campaign engagement when he said this, his sentiment can also easily be applied to marketers’ habit of pushing their way into channels that consumers prefer to use for communicating with family and friends rather than focusing on the channels like email where consumers most want to hear from brands.

Marketers: Manage Your Audiences

“The customers are the assets; not the store and not the ecommerce sites.”

— Michael Brown, partner at A.T. Kearney

Marketers too often get confused about what they’re supposed to be managing. Often, they think they should be managing product inventories. In particular, email marketers often think they should be managing email campaigns.

As Michael points out, the truth is that marketers should be managing their audiences. I certainly understand that business demands routinely drive the goals of email and other digital marketing campaigns, but the overarching focus should be on serving your audience. If you do that well — sending relevant campaigns at the right time and right cadence — then you’ll likely find that you’re also meeting your business goals.

Trim That Bloated Email Content

“When you emphasize everything, you emphasize nothing.”

— Herschell Gordon Lewis, author of “Effective E-mail Marketing

Everybody wants a piece of email marketing, so marketers often find themselves fending off requests from their co-workers in merchandising, operations and beyond. (It’s because of those persistent merchandisers that so many marketers think their job is managing inventory levels.) If unshielded from that, email marketers often feel pressured to include an excessive amount of content in the messages they craft, with that clutter undermining overall performance.

Given the trend toward shorter, more focused emails with fewer calls-to-action, as well as the trend toward AI-driven content, it’s more important than ever to have a curated and clear content hierarchy to guide your time-starved subscribers to the actions you most want them to take. When it comes to email content, more usually isn’t better.

Make That Next Email Better

“The strength and power of anything — whether it is a business, an individual fitness plan, or event — has its foundation in an accumulation of small, incremental improvements that all either fit together or build on each other. To sum it up: small improvement x consistency = substance.”

— Nicole Penn, president of The EGC Group

One of my favourite things about email marketing is that it’s a channel that’s built for iteration. It doesn’t matter so much if your last campaign wasn’t perfect, or if you made this mistake or that mistake, because chances are that you’re sending another campaign in two or three days, if not sooner. And every send is an opportunity to get a little better.

I’ve tried to bring this spirit of iteration to “Email Marketing Rules.” With each new edition, I’ve added new rules, concepts and checklists — which are both a reflection of email marketing’s growing complexity and my own personal growth as an email marketer. I hope you’ll join me on this journey of incremental improvement.

Feature Image Credit: Mushy on Adobe Stock Photo

By Chad S. White

Chad S. White is the author of four editions of Email Marketing Rules and Head of Research for Oracle Marketing Consulting, a global full-service digital marketing agency inside of Oracle.

Sourced from CMSWIRE

By Liviu Tanase

Is your email marketing ready for the busiest shopping season? Take these five simple steps to set yourself up for success and increase email ROI during the holidays.

People spent $1.14 trillion online and $270 billion in the U.S. during last year’s holiday season. For businesses like yours, the coming months have the highest sales potential — and for that, you need a reliable strategy.

Email marketing is competitive 365 days a year, but the last quarter? It all comes to a head. With so many companies fighting for attention and dollars, you can’t afford to have anything go wrong.

From figuring out the right offers to preparing your email list, here are five steps you can take today to get better holiday email marketing results.

1. Create different offers for each audience segment

Your customers’ journey with your company can be wildly different. For instance, a repeat customer will have different needs compared to a prospect who just created an account on your website. So, when you and your team brainstorm holiday email campaigns, you must take these details into account and segment your audience.

If the effort of splitting your list intimidates you, stay focused on the benefits. Open rates are 14% higher for segmented campaigns, which means you’ll have higher chances to convert.

2. Verify your customers’ email addresses

Now that you’re clear on the offers for each customer segment, it’s time to check the health of your email lists. Looking at your most recent email marketing reports is a good place to start. For instance, if your bounce rate exceeds 2%, you know it’s time to run your databases through an email verifier. Otherwise, your email deliverability will suffer. This is not a time when you can risk having your emails go to spam.

After verifying more than six billion email addresses in a year, ZeroBounce found that only 57% of them were valid and safe to keep. Your email list decays monthly, so remove obsolete data and also check every new address you gather.

3. Run an email blacklist check

Have you noticed a steep decline in your open rates and clicks in the past few months? Your IP or domain could be blacklisted. Mailbox providers (like Yahoo or Gmail) and anti-spam organizations maintain email blacklists to block senders with a history of spam-sending. However, even senders with good intentions can land on a blacklist if they don’t maintain healthy email lists and follow best practices. In most cases, emails from blocked senders never make it to their recipients.

Email blacklists are updated in real-time. The best way to find out if your IP or domain is flagged is to use a blacklist checker. Such tools run tests against hundreds of blacklists and alert you if there’s trouble.

4. Part with subscribers who never click

Every email list has its devoted fans, who open every email, and subscribers who rarely or never click. While these email addresses don’t bounce, their lack of interaction sends Internet service providers (ISPs) the wrong message about you. If a large segment of your list doesn’t open your emails, are you relevant enough to be in the inbox? Unengaged subscribers may cause your campaigns to go to spam, so if you haven’t removed them in more than six months, now is the time.

You may be nervous about reducing your email list right before the holidays, but you’ll enjoy more engagement. Since they haven’t opened any of your emails in months, those subscribers weren’t likely to convert anyway.

5. Send a gift to boost engagement

To increase engagement ahead of the holidays, start warming up your prospects a few weeks before launching your campaigns. An effective tactic is to create a series of educational emails to relieve some of your customers’ pain points. Whether you run a B2B or a retail business, think of free content offers to create your emails around. A free e-book, infographic or useful video can go a long way in building trust and standing out in people’s inboxes.

Remember: healthy engagement feeds your email deliverability, showing ISPs that your content is relevant. Nurture your audience with outstanding emails before you go for the hard sell.

Bonus tip: keep sending those great emails

Aside from sending compelling content, sending it regularly is what helps your email marketing the most. If throughout the year you’ve been inconsistent, now you want to gradually ramp up volume. You’ll build a stronger connection to your customers, and your email deliverability will benefit.

Avoid sudden and drastic volume increases, as ISPs can flag that behaviour as suspicious. The more predictable you are, the better chance you have of getting your email campaigns in the inbox.

By Liviu Tanase

Founder & CEO of ZeroBounce

Liviu Tanase is a serial entrepreneur and telecommunication executive with extensive experience in the creation, growth and sale of novel technologies. He is currently the CEO of ZeroBounce, an email validation and deliverability platform.

Sourced from Entrepreneur

By Chad S. White

Brands have two major levers they can pull to protect themselves from the negative effects of growing use of generative AI.

The Gist

  • AI disruption. Generative AI is set to disrupt SEO significantly.
  • Content shielding. Brands need strategies to protect their content from AI.
  • Direct relationships. Building strong direct relationships is key.

Do your customers trust your brand more than ChatGPT?

The answer to that question will determine which brands truly have credibility and authority in the years ahead and which do not.

Those who are more trustworthy than generative AI engines will:

  1. Be destinations for answer-seekers, generating strong direct traffic to their websites and robust app usage.
  2. Be able to build large first-party audiences via email, SMS, push and other channels.

Both of those will be critical for any brand wanting to insulate themselves from the search engine optimization (SEO) traffic loss that will be caused by generative AI.

The Threat to SEO

Despite racking up 100 million users just two months after launching — an all-time record — ChatGPT doesn’t appear to be having a noticeable impact on the many billions of searches that happen every day yet. However, it’s not hard to imagine it and other large language models (LLMs) taking a sizable bite out of search market share as they improve and become more reliable.

And improve they will. After all, Microsoft, Google and others are investing tens of billions of dollars into generative AI engines. Long dominating the search engine market, Google in particular is keenly aware of the enormous risk to its business, which is why it declared a Code Red and marshalled all available resources into AI development.

If you accept that generative AI will improve significantly over the next few years — and probably dramatically by the end of the decade — and therefore consumers will inevitability get more answers to their questions through zero-click engagements, which are already sizable, then it begs the question:

What should brands consider doing to maintain brand visibility and authority, as well as avoid losing value on the investments they’ve made in content?

Protective Measures From Negative Generative AI Effects

Brands have two major levers they can pull to protect themselves from the negative effects of growing use of generative AI.

1. Shielding Content From Generative AI Training

Major legal battles will be fought in the years ahead to clarify what rights copyright holders have in this new age and what still constitutes Fair Use. Content and social media platforms are likely to try to redefine the copyright landscape in their favor, amending their user agreements to give themselves more rights over the content that’s shared on their platforms.

A white robot hand holds a gavel above a sound block sitting on a wooden table.
Andrey Popov on Adobe Stock Photo

You can already see the split in how companies are deciding to proceed. For example, while Getty Images’ is suing Stable Diffusion over copyright violations in training its AI, Shutterstock is instead partnering with OpenAI, having decided that it has the right to sell its contributors’ content as training material to AI engines. Although Shutterstock says it doesn’t need to compensate its contributors, it has created a contributors fund to pay those whose works are used most by AI engines. It is also giving contributors the ability to opt out of having their content used as AI training material.

Since Google was permitted to scan and share copyrighted books without compensating authors, it’s entirely reasonable to assume that generative AI will also be allowed to use copyrighted works without agreements or compensation of copyright holders. So, content providers shouldn’t expect the law to protect them.

Given all of that, brands can protect themselves by:

  • Gating more of their web content, whether that’s behind paywalls, account logins or lead generation forms. Although there are disputes, both search and AI engines shouldn’t be crawling behind paywalls.
  • Releasing some content in password-protected PDFs. While web-hosted PDFs are crawlable, password-protected ones are not. Because consumers aren’t used to frequently encountering password-protected PDFs, some education would be necessary. Moreover, this approach would be most appropriate for your highest-value content.
  • Distributing more content via subscriber-exclusive channels, including email, push and print. Inboxes are considered privacy spaces, so crawling this content is already a no-no. While print publications like books have been scanned in the past by Google and others, smaller publications would likely be safe from scanning efforts.

In addition to those, hopefully brands will gain a noindex equivalent to tell companies not to train their large language models (LLMs) and other AI tools on the content of their webpages.

Of course, while shielding their content from external generative AI engines, brands could also deploy generative AI within their own sites as a way to help visitors and customers find the information they’re looking for. For most brands, this would be a welcome augmentation to their site search functionality.

2. Building Stronger Direct Relationships

While shielding your content is the defensive play, building your first-party audiences is the offensive play. Put another way, now that you’ve kept your valuable content out of the hands of generative AI engines, you need to get it into the hands of your target audience.

You do that by building out your subscription-based channels like email and push. On your email signup forms, highlight the exclusive nature of the content you’ll be sharing. If you’re going to be personalizing the content that you send, highlight that, too.

Brands have the opportunity to both turn their emails into personalized homepages for their subscribers, as well as to turn their subscribers’ inboxes into personalized search engines.

Email Marketing Reinvents Itself Again

Brands already have urgent reasons to build out their first-party audiences. One is the sunsetting of third-party cookies and the need for more customer data. Email marketing and loyalty programs, in particular, along with SMS, are great at collecting both zero-party data through preference centers and progressive profiling, as well as first-party data through channel engagement data.

Another is the increasingly evident dangers of building on the “rented land” of social media. For example, Facebook is slowly declining, Twitter has cut 80% of its staff to avoid bankruptcy as its value plunges, and TikTok faces growing bans around the world. Some are even claiming we’re witnessing the beginning of the end of the age of social media. I wouldn’t go that far, but brands certainly have lots of reasons to focus more on those channels they have much more control over, including the web, loyalty, SMS, and, of course, email.

So, the disruption of search engine optimization by generative AI is just providing another compelling reason to invest more into email programs, or to acquire them. It’s hard not to see this as just another case of email marketing reinventing itself and making itself more relevant to brands yet again.

Feature Image Credit: Andrey Popov on Adobe Stock Photo

By Chad S. White

Chad S. White is the author of four editions of Email Marketing Rules and Head of Research for Oracle Marketing Consulting, a global full-service digital marketing agency inside of Oracle. Connect with Chad S. White:  

Sourced from CMSWIRE

By Mustafa Saeed

We live in a time where anyone can attract a large audience by sharing content online. Even the most innocent product review blog can attract millions of monthly visitors. This can be very lucrative, with some bloggers earning six figures—although this isn’t the case for everyone. But even smaller, more local/niche bloggers can earn a living and attract large brand deals.

As a creator, the bond you have with your audience can be invaluable—it enables you to build a trusting relationship focused on a specific niche or shared interest. Your audience can be an asset to brands—especially those in the beauty and personal care, fashion and apparel, and health and wellness categories. Having an army of bloggers ready to share the latest and greatest about their brand is an advantage many companies are willing to pay a pretty penny for.

There are many ways to monetize your blog content and garner an audience on multiple platforms. Below, I’ll share the tactics I recommend to the bloggers I work with. Many of these tactics are used by well-known bloggers as well.

Brand Sponsorships

Sponsoring posts is a common way that brands work with bloggers. For example, brands may share upcoming product launches early for bloggers and pay them to write honest reviews. You can make hundreds if not thousands per post—depending on your audience size, engagement, niche and the scope of the sponsorship. However, smaller bloggers may only be able to secure free products in exchange for a review.

To tap into brand sponsorships, create a list of brands that align with your niche and shared interests. Then send each brand a tailored pitch highlighting your audience reach, engagement and ideas for the partnership. Reach out through email, social media or special events/meetups.

Networking and building relationships are important for cultivating brand sponsorships. By forging strong relationships with brands, you can tap into a powerful synergy that not only benefits your blog’s profitability but also offers brands a unique and compelling partnership opportunity.

Affiliate Marketing

Instead of brands paying for a post upfront, you can work together through affiliate marketing—meaning you make a commission whenever your readers purchase a product using a unique tracking link or discount code. This creates a flexible relationship with the brand and can allow you to make more money as there’s often no limit to how many sales you can generate and when you stop earning commission from your posts.

Showing Ads

You also can make money by showing ads on your blog. Google AdSense is a popular tool to enable this. With AdSense, you can display ads that are tailored to your site’s content and audience. These ads, which may include text, images, videos or interactive media, are managed and sorted by Google. You can earn revenue either through clicks on the ads or through ad impressions.

While AdSense is widely used, one alternative is Media.net, which provides contextually relevant ads that seamlessly integrate into your content. Another option is Ezoic, a platform that uses AI to optimize ad placements for maximum revenue potential.

Email Marketing

The most successful bloggers usually have multiple mechanisms for bringing visitors back to their site—you can’t count on them coming back organically. Publishing an email newsletter and prompting your readers to subscribe gives you another way to communicate with your audience, and it can help increase your ad revenue by boosting your site traffic.

An engaged list of email subscribers can also be attractive to advertisers and gives you another platform to monetize. You can sell email placements as part of affiliate or brand sponsorship deals.

Optimizing For Search Engines

Use SEO tactics to increase your visibility on search engines and attract new readers. Most successful bloggers are constantly optimizing their posts and website for search engines. Make your blog more searchable by optimizing your content with relevant keywords, meta descriptions and internal links. Ensure fast loading speeds and responsive design. Invest in high-quality backlinks and monitor search performance through Google Search Console to adapt to evolving search algorithms.

Social Media And Community Groups

Create communities outside of your blog where readers can share like-minded content and interact with you and each other. This gives you additional platforms to monetize and promote your blog posts—similar to an email list. Popular platforms include Facebook, Discord, Slack and more. This also creates places for you to host engaging discussions, livestreams and events.

Be Transparent About Brand Sponsorships

Ensure that you disclose paid sponsorships, affiliate deals and endorsements to maintain trust with readers. This is especially important with the increased public scrutiny around celebrity-owned brands and paid influencer endorsements. Your ability to source sponsorship and affiliate deals depends on the trust you have with your readers. If they don’t trust you, they won’t buy from you.

You also need to be transparent to adhere to guidelines set by the Federal Trade Commission and other regulatory bodies. Clear, conspicuous and accurate disclosures are essential to ensure legal compliance and prevent misleading audiences.

Final Thoughts

The world of blogging presents a remarkable opportunity for both content creators and brands. As you build trusted relationships with your audience and hone your monetization strategies, you can achieve financial success through brand sponsorships, affiliate marketing, showing ads on your site, email marketing, SEO optimization and community engagement.

Other avenues to explore include courses, coaching programs, podcasts and memberships. These can help you diversify your income stream and solidify your position in the ever-expanding digital landscape.

Whichever monetization methods you use, make sure you’re being transparent about brand partnerships and complying with advertising regulations to preserve the essential trust you build with your readers.

Feature Image Credit: getty

By Mustafa Saeed

Co-Founder & Growth Chief at Paul Street. Read Mustafa Saeed’s full executive profile here.

Sourced from Forbes

Brands have two major levers they can pull to protect themselves from the negative effects of growing use of generative AI.

The Gist

  • AI disruption. Generative AI is set to disrupt SEO significantly.
  • Content shielding. Brands need strategies to protect their content from AI.
  • Direct relationships. Building strong direct relationships is key.

Do your customers trust your brand more than ChatGPT?

The answer to that question will determine which brands truly have credibility and authority in the years ahead and which do not.

Those who are more trustworthy than generative AI engines will:

  1. Be destinations for answer-seekers, generating strong direct traffic to their websites and robust app usage.
  2. Be able to build large first-party audiences via email, SMS, push and other channels.

Both of those will be critical for any brand wanting to insulate themselves from the search engine optimization (SEO) traffic loss that will be caused by generative AI.

The Threat to SEO

Despite racking up 100 million users just two months after launching — an all-time record — ChatGPT doesn’t appear to be having a noticeable impact on the many billions of searches that happen every day yet. However, it’s not hard to imagine it and other large language models (LLMs) taking a sizable bite out of search market share as they improve and become more reliable.

And improve they will. After all, Microsoft, Google and others are investing tens of billions of dollars into generative AI engines. Long dominating the search engine market, Google in particular is keenly aware of the enormous risk to its business, which is why it declared a Code Red and marshalled all available resources into AI development.

If you accept that generative AI will improve significantly over the next few years — and probably dramatically by the end of the decade — and therefore consumers will inevitability get more answers to their questions through zero-click engagements, which are already sizable, then it begs the question:

What should brands consider doing to maintain brand visibility and authority, as well as avoid losing value on the investments they’ve made in content?

Protective Measures From Negative Generative AI Effects

Brands have two major levers they can pull to protect themselves from the negative effects of growing use of generative AI.

1. Shielding Content From Generative AI Training

Major legal battles will be fought in the years ahead to clarify what rights copyright holders have in this new age and what still constitutes Fair Use. Content and social media platforms are likely to try to redefine the copyright landscape in their favour, amending their user agreements to give themselves more rights over the content that’s shared on their platforms.

A white robot hand holds a gavel above a sound block sitting on a wooden table.
Andrey Popov on Adobe Stock Photo

You can already see the split in how companies are deciding to proceed. For example, while Getty Images’ is suing Stable Diffusion over copyright violations in training its AI, Shutterstock is instead partnering with OpenAI, having decided that it has the right to sell its contributors’ content as training material to AI engines. Although Shutterstock says it doesn’t need to compensate its contributors, it has created a contributors fund to pay those whose works are used most by AI engines. It is also giving contributors the ability to opt out of having their content used as AI training material.

Since Google was permitted to scan and share copyrighted books without compensating authors, it’s entirely reasonable to assume that generative AI will also be allowed to use copyrighted works without agreements or compensation of copyright holders. So, content providers shouldn’t expect the law to protect them.

Given all of that, brands can protect themselves by:

  • Gating more of their web content, whether that’s behind paywalls, account logins or lead generation forms. Although there are disputes, both search and AI engines shouldn’t be crawling behind paywalls.
  • Releasing some content in password-protected PDFs. While web-hosted PDFs are crawlable, password-protected ones are not. Because consumers aren’t used to frequently encountering password-protected PDFs, some education would be necessary. Moreover, this approach would be most appropriate for your highest-value content.
  • Distributing more content via subscriber-exclusive channels, including email, push and print. Inboxes are considered privacy spaces, so crawling this content is already a no-no. While print publications like books have been scanned in the past by Google and others, smaller publications would likely be safe from scanning efforts.

In addition to those, hopefully brands will gain a noindex equivalent to tell companies not to train their large language models (LLMs) and other AI tools on the content of their webpages.

Of course, while shielding their content from external generative AI engines, brands could also deploy generative AI within their own sites as a way to help visitors and customers find the information they’re looking for. For most brands, this would be a welcome augmentation to their site search functionality.

2. Building Stronger Direct Relationships

While shielding your content is the defensive play, building your first-party audiences is the offensive play. Put another way, now that you’ve kept your valuable content out of the hands of generative AI engines, you need to get it into the hands of your target audience.

You do that by building out your subscription-based channels like email and push. On your email signup forms, highlight the exclusive nature of the content you’ll be sharing. If you’re going to be personalizing the content that you send, highlight that, too.

Brands have the opportunity to both turn their emails into personalized homepages for their subscribers, as well as to turn their subscribers’ inboxes into personalized search engines.

Email Marketing Reinvents Itself Again

Brands already have urgent reasons to build out their first-party audiences. One is the sunsetting of third-party cookies and the need for more customer data. Email marketing and loyalty programs, in particular, along with SMS, are great at collecting both zero-party data through preference centers and progressive profiling, as well as first-party data through channel engagement data.

Another is the increasingly evident dangers of building on the “rented land” of social media. For example, Facebook is slowly declining, Twitter has cut 80% of its staff to avoid bankruptcy as its value plunges, and TikTok faces growing bans around the world. Some are even claiming we’re witnessing the beginning of the end of the age of social media. I wouldn’t go that far, but brands certainly have lots of reasons to focus more on those channels they have much more control over, including the web, loyalty, SMS, and, of course, email.

So, the disruption of search engine optimization by generative AI is just providing another compelling reason to invest more into email programs, or to acquire them. It’s hard not to see this as just another case of email marketing reinventing itself and making itself more relevant to brands yet again.

By Chad S. White

Chad S. White is the author of four editions of Email Marketing Rules and Head of Research for Oracle Marketing Consulting, a global full-service digital marketing agency inside of Oracle.

Sourced from CMSWIRE

chatgpt,  digital experience, search, email marketing, artificial intelligence, generative ai, artificial intelligence in marketing

 

By Sam Driver

Navigating the tricky landscape of email marketing?

Email deliverability is your secret weapon to bypass the dreaded spam folder and land directly in your audience’s inbox.

Packed with actionable insights and techniques, our guide will transform your emails from avoidable spam to must-read content.

Ready to unlock your email potential and boost your marketing game?

Let’s jump in!

What is Email Deliverability (& Why it’s Important)?

In the labyrinth of email marketing, email deliverability stands as your secret weapon.

But what exactly does it entail?

At its simplest, email deliverability refers to the ability of your emails to land directly into subscribers’ inboxes.

Seems straightforward, doesn’t it? However, the subtleties in the concept beg for a deeper understanding.

Consider this… studies reveal that an acceptable email delivery rate hovers around 95%.

To break it down, for every 1000 emails you send, approximately 950 should hit the bullseye — the inbox.

But what about the elusive remaining 50?

These strays might find themselves lost in the wilderness of the spam folder, a destination dreaded by every email marketer.

Now, you might be asking yourself, why does email deliverability hold such weight?

The reason is quite simple…

Even the most creatively engaging email crafted with finesse amounts to naught if it doesn’t reach the recipient’s inbox. It’s akin to writing an excellent novel that no one reads.

Plus, understanding the importance of email deliverability sets a sturdy foundation for your email campaign.

Now, let’s delve into the tips…

12 Email Deliverability Tips That’ll Elevate Your Delivery Rate & Avoid the Spam Folder

A hand clicking a glowing email icon in the air.

Now that we understand the basics of email deliverability let’s discuss the actionable strategies you can adopt to avoid the spam folder and elevate your delivery rate…

1. Understand ISP Guidelines

Every Internet Service Provider (ISP), like Amazon SES, Google Workspace, or Constant Contact, has a unique set of guidelines that they use to determine what emails get delivered and what emails get marked as spam.

These guidelines often include technical aspects like IP and domain reputation, the relevance of your content, and your history of following CAN-SPAM laws. Ignoring these guidelines can result in a decrease in your delivery rate.

For instance, if you’re using Google Workspace, it’s crucial to be familiar with their bulk sender guidelines.

Google evaluates emails based on factors like authentication, list quality, and sending practices.

So, by tailoring your email marketing campaign in line with these guidelines, you can improve your chances of avoiding the spam folder.

2. Authenticate Your Emails

Email authentication is like a digital signature; it proves your emails originate from a legitimate source.

Techniques like Sender Policy Framework (SPF), DomainKeys Identified Mail (DKIM), and Domain-based Message Authentication, Reporting & Conformance (DMARC) play a pivotal role in maintaining your sender reputation.

Let’s say you are sending an email from “[email protected]”.

With SPF, you can authorize your domain to send emails, effectively preventing spammers from using it.

DKIM, on the other hand, allows you to add a digital signature to your emails, validating your domain name identity.

And DMARC, a protocol that uses SPF and DKIM, helps protect your domain from phishing scams and spoofing.

When implemented correctly, these authentication techniques tell ISPs that you are who you claim to be, increasing the likelihood of your emails landing in the inbox.

3. Maintain a Good Sender Reputation

Maintaining a robust sender reputation is essential for high email deliverability. Your sender reputation is like a credit score; it demonstrates your trustworthiness as a sender.

Factors contributing to this reputation include your email volume, complaint rate, bounce rate, and whether or not you’ve been blacklisted in the past.

For instance, if your emails frequently bounce because the recipient’s addresses are incorrect or no longer in use, ISPs might see this as a sign of poor list management and flag your emails as spam.

Thus, it’s crucial to regularly check and clean your email list to maintain a good sender reputation.

4. Manage Your Email List

monitor your list to improve email deliverability

Your email list is a valuable asset. However, it’s not just about size; it’s about quality and engagement.

Regularly cleaning your email list of inactive subscribers, addresses that bounce, and spam traps can increase your sender score, which ISPs use to determine if your email is spam or not.

For example, if a user hasn’t opened your emails in the past six months, it might be worth removing them from your list or placing them in a re-engagement campaign.

Similarly, if an email bounces more than once, it’s best to remove it to prevent harming your sender reputation.

By managing your email list effectively, you not only improve deliverability but also ensure that your content reaches engaged and interested parties.

5. Monitor Email Deliverability

Monitoring your email deliverability is an integral part of your email marketing strategy.

So, consider using email deliverability tools such as Postmark, Mail-tester, or GlockApps.

These tools not only track your delivery rate and inbox placement but also identify issues in your emails that could trigger spam filters.

For example, they can evaluate your subject lines, content, and email list health, providing actionable feedback to improve your deliverability.

Regular monitoring and troubleshooting can help you understand your email performance better and address any potential issues early, ensuring your emails reach their intended inboxes.

6. Content Matters

Content is the heart of your email. It can either make your email a hit or a miss with ISPs’ spam filters.

When crafting your emails, avoid phrases that are commonly used in spam messages, such as “get rich quick,” “risk-free investment,” or “save up to.”

ISPs have advanced spam filters that are triggered by such phrases, which may lead to your emails landing in the spam folder.

Furthermore, avoid using a single large image in place of text. If your email is just one big image with minimal text, spam filters may become suspicious and flag it.

Instead, maintain a healthy text-to-image ratio and use ALT text for images, ensuring your message is still conveyed even if the images don’t load.

7. Personalize Your Emails

Personalized emails resonate more with your subscribers and have a lesser chance of being marked as spam.

Rather than sending the same generic message to everyone on your list, use personalization techniques to make your emails more relevant and engaging.

This could be as simple as addressing the recipient by their first name in the subject line or as complex as using behavioural data to customize the content to each recipient’s interests or past actions.

For instance, if a subscriber recently purchased a coffee maker from your website, you could send them an email with tips on brewing the perfect cup of coffee.

Not only does personalization improve engagement, but it also helps to build a deeper relationship with your subscribers.

8. Ask to be Whitelisted

email deliverability whitelist

Whitelisting is like having a VIP pass to your subscriber’s inbox. When a subscriber adds you to their email provider’s whitelist, it tells the provider that they want to receive your emails, significantly reducing the chances of your emails being marked as spam.

You can encourage subscribers to whitelist you by including a simple request in your welcome email or in the footer of your newsletters.

For example, “To ensure our emails always reach your inbox, please add our email address to your contacts or safe senders list.”

The process of whitelisting varies between email providers, so it’s helpful to include a link to a page with step-by-step instructions for different providers.

This proactive step can greatly enhance your email deliverability and ensure a consistent subscriber experience.

9. Respect the Unsubscribe

Honouring your subscribers’ wishes isn’t just about goodwill; it’s also a solid strategy for email deliverability. If a subscriber wants to leave, make it as straightforward as possible for them.

This may seem counterintuitive, but in reality, it’s better than getting a spam complaint which can tarnish your sender reputation.

Besides, an unengaged audience can harm your open and click-through rates. Implement a one-click unsubscribe option in a clear, easy-to-spot area in your email. Also, consider having an exit survey.

This optional feedback form can provide invaluable insights into why subscribers are leaving, helping you to improve and adapt your content strategy.

10. Use a Reputable Email Service Provider (ESP)

Your choice of ESP could make or break your email deliverability. A good ESP, not only offers robust infrastructure but also provides valuable advice and support to improve your email deliverability.

They manage relationships with ISPs and stay updated on the ever-changing landscape of email regulations, ensuring your emails are always compliant. Moreover, top-tier ESPs offer comprehensive analytics tools.

These tools can help you monitor your email campaigns, enabling you to spot any potential issues and adapt your strategy accordingly.

11. Test Your Emails

Regular email testing is a must for achieving high deliverability rates.

This is more than just sending a test email to a friend. Services such as GlockApps or Mail-Tester allow you to check if your emails are landing in the spam folder, if your IP has been blacklisted, or if you’re encountering other deliverability issues.

It’s also crucial to test your emails across different email clients (like Gmail, Yahoo, Outlook) and devices to ensure your content displays correctly.

Use A to B testing to see what subject lines, email content, or sending times resonate most with your audience, further optimizing your email marketing strategy.

12. Monitor Your Metrics

Metrics are your North Star in the realm of email deliverability. Key metrics such as delivery rate, open rate, click-through rate, and bounce rate can offer valuable insights into your performance.

For instance, a high bounce rate could indicate an outdated email list, while a low open rate might suggest your subject lines aren’t captivating enough.

Monitoring these metrics allows you to identify trends, spot issues, and make data-driven decisions to optimize your campaigns.

Remember, continuous improvement is the name of the game in email marketing.

Use these metrics to guide your strategy, refine your messaging, and ultimately, deliver emails your audience is eager to open.

Mastering the Art of Email Deliverability

You’ve weathered the storm, wrestling with frustration as your meticulously crafted emails vanished into spam.

But cheer up, there’s a silver lining.

With our email deliverability tips, your emails will no longer be the wallflower at the party, but the guest of honour in your recipient’s inbox.

So, stand tall, and let’s conquer that spam folder together!

By Sam Driver

Sam is an Associate Editor for Smart Blogger and family man who loves to write. When he’s not goofing around with his kids, he’s honing his craft to provide lasting value to anyone who cares to listen.

Sourced from SmartBlogger

By Trevor Sinclair

Are you struggling with email marketing? Do you want to increase your conversion rates and ROI? Look no further than ChatGPT for email marketing.

With email marketing boasting an average ROI of $38 for every $1 spent and 81% of SMBs relying on it as their primary customer acquisition channel, it’s a strategy you can’t ignore.

However, navigating this marketing channel can be confusing, leaving many businesses lost in the woods without a clear map or compass.

In this blog post, we’ll guide you through using ChatGPT to create killer email content that speaks directly to your audience’s fears, anxieties, hopes, and dreams, helping you move the needle.

Benefits of ChatGPT for Email Marketing

What are the benefits of using this AI chatbot in your email marketing efforts? Let’s take a look.

Subject Line Generation

Did you know that the average office worker receives a whopping 121 emails a day? With so many emails in their inbox, having a subject line that grabs attention is crucial.

Studies show that 47% of email recipients open an email based solely on the subject line. Luckily, ChatGPT can generate subject lines that are eye-catching and relevant to the email content.

Body Copy

According to HubSpot, personalized email messages can improve click-through rates by 14% on average and conversions by 10%. With ChatGPT, you can generate personalized and engaging body copy that resonates with your target audience.

A/B Testing

A/B testing is a must. It lets you identify the elements driving conversions and optimize your campaigns accordingly. Studies show that A/B testing increases open rates by a whopping 29%. With ChatGPT, you can quickly create different versions of an email to see which performs best.

Ask ChatGPT for Critiques

This powerful tool can provide valuable insights and recommendations for improving your email marketing efforts. For example, ask if your email draft contains any spam trigger words!

Golden ChatGPT Email Formula

If you rely on ChatGPT to do all the heavy lifting, you will end up with thin, generic content that won’t resonate with anyone.

But when you combine your knowledge of your audience with the power of ChatGPT for productivity and efficiency, the results can be incredible.

The formula is simple yet powerful: W + W + K/B

  • Who am I talking to? What do they do for a living? What are their interests and pain points?
  • What action do I want this person to take? Do you want them to book a consultation? Or subscribe to your list? Download a free e-book?
  • What does this person need to know or believe in to take action? The benefits of the new product, how it compares to similar products, and why it’s worth the investment. What biases or objections might they have about your service? Is it the cost? The time commitment? The trustworthiness of providers they’ve had in the past?

These are essential questions that every email marketer should be asking themselves before they even start writing.

To use the Golden ChatGPT Email Formula with ChatGPT, feed the information into ChatGPT as context before you ask it to generate outputs.

The Most Important Thing in Email Marketing

The secret sauce in email marketing is knowing your subscriber like the back of your hand.

If you want your subscribers to feel like you really get them, you’ve got to talk to them about their fears, anxieties, hopes, and dreams. Maybe they’re struggling with acne, their weight, or their finances. Maybe they absolutely love Pomeranians!

And not just any old way, but in their own words.

That’s how you build trust and empathy, which gets your emails eagerly anticipated, opened, and acted on.

But you can only do that if you know your subscriber like they’re your best friend.

So how do you get to know them?

The best way is to talk to them directly via a survey.

Email Survey ChatGPT Prompt

Here’s a great ChatGPT prompt for this:

“Imagine you represent a [niche] brand that wants to improve its products based on customer feedback. Compose an email to a customer who recently purchased an [Offer] from [Brand]. In the Email, cover the following points:

Thank the customer for their recent purchase and express your appreciation for their support.

Ask the customer to share their thoughts on the product.

Ask the following questions in the email:

  • What made you choose [OFFER]?
  • Have you tried similar products before? If so, which ones and how do they compare to [OFFER]?
  • Has [OFFER] made a positive impact on your life? If so, how?
  • Is there anything we can do to improve [OFFER]?

Assure the customer that their responses will be kept confidential and will help you improve your products and services in the future. Lastly, thank the customer for the feedback. Use [niche] puns and write as if you’re talking from friend to friend.”

The Ultimate ChatGPT Subject Line Formula

Here’s a powerful formula that can significantly increase the chances of your emails getting opened:

Curiosity + Self-Interest = lots of opens.

John Caples, a legendary copywriter, and author of Tested Advertising Methods, introduced this formula.

Next, we’ll discuss how you can apply this formula to your email subject lines.

ChatGPT Subject Line Generation Prompts

Here are some email subject line prompts you will love.

1. Deconstruct + Repuporse

If you already have a list of effective subject lines, you can ask ChatGPT to repurpose them for your niche + audience.

I got my hands on these:

  • At-home workouts don’t work, unless…
  • Top 4 beginner workout “errors” revealed
  • Maybe the laziest way to double your fitness results
  • Add This to Your Coffee for Health

Next, I asked ChatGPT to repurpose these subject lines for a dog audience (and what they care about). This is where you insert the expertise we gathered from the survey!

2. Weird Mechanism + Desired Benefit

A weird mechanism is an unconventional way to achieve a desired benefit. For example, when people encounter something unexpected or unusual, they’re more likely to take notice and investigate further.

Here are some examples of subject lines that showcase the [weird mechanism] + [desired benefit] formula for a dog audience:

  • “Weird doggy treat banishes bad breath (and improves their mood)”
  • “Tibetan method trains dog to clean up their toys”
  • “Strange Tibetan secret gets your dog to love crate”
  • “Little-known technique reduces separation anxiety”

Next, use this formula to instruct ChatGPT to generate subject lines for your niche. Again, it’s best to prompt ChatGPT with relevant examples to your audience.

Lastly, emphasize the goal to pique curiosity, and voila!

3. Problem + Hint at Solution

This classic space ad formula is one of my all-time favourites.

Here’s how it goes: you start with a specific problem and then drop a hint at the solution. After that, it works like a charm.

Sure, you might see a dip in open rates, but the specificity of the problem can lead to more clicks and conversions.

Here are some examples:

  • Tired of being tired? Natural cure
  • Can’t focus? Do this!

Now, you can instruct ChatGPT to follow the formula I’ve provided.

Make sure to add context surrounding the following questions:

  • Who are you writing for?
  • What do you want to emphasize?
  • What is the intent of the email subject line?

How To Hook Email Readers with ChatGPT (From The First Word)

You can have all the opens in the world, but if your readers aren’t hooked from the first word, they don’t read the rest of your email. They aren’t going to buy anything, either!

So, what’s the secret to getting your readers to dive right in? That opening line has got to be on point.

Here are a few rules to hook more readers:

  • It should be congruent with your subject line
  • Keep it short and sweet
  • Stimulate curiosity or promise a benefit, or better yet, both!

1. Open with a Surprising Fact

First, try opening your emails with a surprising fact; ChatGPT can help you. Facts can capture readers’ attention and pique their curiosity, making them more likely to read on. (We go into detail on how to find facts with ChatGPT).

2. Lead with an Irresistible Story

Next, ask ChatGPT to craft an irresistible story, but ensure it’s centered around your subscriber. For maximum impact, the story should demonstrate how your reader can gain a desired benefit or avoid pain or problem they fear.

Using ChatGPT for Email Marketing (Prompt and Email Ideas)

Here are some ideas for you to try with different types of emails.

1. Re-Engage a “Dead” List

Do you have an email list that’s been idle for a while? I have a template that can help you out.

Before you blast emails using these ChatGPT prompts, re-engage your “dead” list.

The power of this template is to make your email heartfelt.

Begin by admitting, “Hey, I know I haven’t honoured my end of the bargain,” so that your subscribers know you’re a genuine person who realizes you haven’t delivered the emails your subscribers signed up for.

From there, emphasize the value (or the promise of value soon) you’ll provide. It could be new product launches or exclusive tips and tricks that your subscribers will appreciate.

However, giving subscribers an easy way out is crucial if they prefer to opt out. This shows that you respect their time and inbox and empowers them to take control of their relationship with you.

So look at the template below, customize it, and let’s revive your email list!

  • Start with a greeting and introduce yourself.
  • Acknowledge the lapse in communication and apologize for it.
  • Emphasize the importance of consistency and engagement in building relationships.
  • Reiterate your content’s value and express your commitment to providing more of it.
  • Offer either new content/resources or a question to engage the subscriber and encourage a response.
  • End by thanking the subscriber and offering an opportunity to unsubscribe if they are no longer interested.

2. The Welcome Email

Your welcome Email is the workhorse of your business emails. It’s like a first date that determines the course of your relationship with your subscriber. Will they see you as a trustworthy friend or leave you in their inbox with hundreds of others?

Don’t forget to include all of these ingredients in your Welcome Email to make sure it’s a success:

  • Make a great first impression
  • Set expectations
  • Request action
  • Polarization

Be bold and come out and say what you stand for (or against). Alexander Hamilton stated, “Those who stand for nothing fall for everything.”

If some people unsubscribe at this stage, that’s a great thing! The objective here is to build a list of people who are aligned with your core values and feel a strong connection to you.

Here’s a prompt to get you started:

  1. Briefly acknowledge and compliment the recipient on inviting you to their inbox, making them feel good about their decision to invite you in.
  2. Acknowledge any previous interactions with the recipient and express excitement to continue the relationship.
  3. Here’s where you mention your freebie. Use this section to overcome the major objection we all must overcome: recipients downloading “freebies” and totally ignoring them.
  4. Use authenticity, storytelling, humour, and tone to connect with the recipient and make your message memorable.
  5. Reinforce the benefits of the content or resources you’re offering and how they can help the recipient achieve their goals.
  6. End with a clear call-to-action, directing the recipient to consume the resource.

And here’s the output!

If you’re struggling to tweak the prompt, don’t be afraid to take my output and use the “Deconstruct + Repurpose” method I highlighted in the subject line section above!

3. The Hold my Hand Email

Now, let’s write a killer “Hold My Hand” email that speaks to those sceptical, jaded, and burned-out subscribers. These prospects want results but feel overwhelmed and confused about how to get there.

Now, the conflict between desire and doubt is something that many buyers face in any market – whether it’s weight loss, dating, business, dog training, or beyond. It’s a tough nut to crack, but it’s not impossible.

The “Hold My Hand” Email is your secret weapon in this battle.

Here’s the structure:

  1. Reaffirm the benefits your subscribers want to achieve. What are their hopes and dreams? What motivates them to make a change in their life? Or what pain are you helping them avoid?
  2. Acknowledge the roadblocks to success that your subscribers have faced in the past. What fears and anxieties have held them back? By acknowledging these roadblocks, you can show your subscribers that it’s not their fault they haven’t achieved the results they want.
  3. Use your subscribers’ words to show that you understand their fears and anxieties. This is a powerful way to build rapport and establish trust.
  4. Amplify their desire by using future pacing to paint a vivid picture of what your subscriber’s life will be like. Use “Imagine If” statements to help your subscribers visualize the positive outcomes of their hard work and dedication.
  5. Finally, link to your offer (program, coaching, etc.) and promise a step-by-step plan or method to help your subscribers achieve their goals. You’ll want to show your unique process, so things will be different this time.

ChatGPT A/B Testing Prompts

Remember my “hold my hand” Email? Well, I asked ChatGPT to give me a variation.

Specifically, I wanted to test a different layout structure and add some “imagine if” statements to get the reader to visualize the desired result of their dog behaving perfectly.

So I kept adding more “imagine if” statements until I had a total of 5!

You can also refine an email by switching up the tone.

While you could ask ChatGPT to switch the tone to “persuasive” or “witty,” aiming for the best in the business is even better.

And who are the best in the business? This list identifies the top 20 copywriters who make the most money. Names like Joe Coleman and Laurence Blume are at the top of the list.

Using AI Templates (With Jasper)

With Jasper, you can forget about spending hours brainstorming and crafting the perfect email copy. Instead, you can leverage its pre-programmed templates to create killer emails in minutes.

I know what you’re thinking: “But Trevor, what about ChatGPT?”

Well, my friend, while ChatGPT is great for generating original content, Jasper’s templates can save you precious time and effort.

It has specific templates you can leverage for both subject lines and email!

Jasper also has an awesome document editor and Boss Mode, so you can write and switch between templates in one place.

ChatGPT For Email Marketing (Feedback and Compliance)

One of the best ways to get feedback on your writing is by using ChatGPT. For email marketing, this can be especially helpful to ensure that your emails are not triggering any spam filters or violating compliance issues.

Simply provide ChatGPT with your Email and ask for suggestions on improving it.

For example, I asked ChatGPT, “Can you please look at this email and point out any spam triggers or compliance issues that might be contained within it? How could I improve it?”

ChatGPT For Email Marketing – Final Thoughts

While ChatGPT can be a valuable tool in email marketing, it’s important to remember that it’s not a substitute for understanding the fundamentals of email marketing, copywriting, and your audience’s needs.

It’s important to remember that ChatGPT is only as good as the information and guidance it’s given. You will be head and shoulders above the average email copywriter using the tips I’ve provided in this article.

So, use ChatGPT wisely and clearly understand its limitations, and you’ll be on your way to crafting successful email campaigns that resonate with your audience.

By Trevor Sinclair

Sourced from Niche Pursuits

By Chad S. White

Here’s what happened after I signed up for over 100 promotional emails. There were some surprises.

The Gist

  • Forget something? Testing out 100 email signups, more than 8% of brands didn’t send a welcome email, missing a valuable opportunity to deepen the relationship with their new subscribers through promotions, education, profiling, expansion or evangelism.
  • Send a series. Nearly half of brands sent a welcome series, with subsequent emails including reminders to use discounts, explanations of brand strengths, pitches for loyalty programs, encouragements to download mobile apps or behind-the-scenes looks at their organizations.
  • Welcoming fails. Some brands missed the mark by using senseless or overly corporate sender names in their welcome emails, while others failed to seasonally optimize or personalize their messages, or had quality control problems.

I shared takeaways from having signed up for promotional emails from 100 brands in my last column, so for this one I want to share what happened next: I received a lot of welcome emails!

But that’s not to say there weren’t some surprises. There were. Here are my key takeaways and the major opportunities I see for brands when it comes to crafting better onboarding experiences.

1. Shocking Number of Brands Didn’t Send a Welcome

More than 8% of the brands didn’t send a welcome email. Instead, they just dropped me into their promotional mail stream. Not only is that slightly jarring, it passes up a big opportunity to deepen the relationship in a way that your promotional emails just can’t.

Here are the five principle messaging strategies for welcome email calls-to-action:

  1. Promotion: trying to drive a purchase through incentives or product promotions.
  2. Education: trying to deepen brand affinity and loyalty by educating the new subscriber about your brand’s history, products, services, values and social causes.
  3. Profiling: trying to to gather more information about the new subscriber so the brand can send more relevant messaging.
  4. Expansion: trying to get the new subscriber to connect with the brand through additional channels.
  5. Evangelism: trying to get the new subscriber to refer their friends or colleagues.

For most of those, messaging them immediately after signup is the ideal time to drive action and establish a healthy long-term relationship.

2. Nearly Half of Brands Sent a Welcome Series

In contrast to brands that didn’t send even one welcome email were those at the other end of the spectrum that sent a welcome series of two, three or even more emails.

What were the subsequent emails in those welcome series about? Brands included:

  • Reminders to use the discount they included in their first welcome, which was very common for retail and ecommerce brands.
  • Explanations of their brand strengths in terms of what’s unique about their products and how they do business, which was popular among direct-to-consumer brands.
  • Pitches to join their loyalty programs, which was also common for retail and ecommerce brands.
  • Encouragements to download their mobile app.
  • Behind-the-scenes looks at their organizations, which was most common among service-oriented brands.

Surprisingly, none tried to collect any preferences from me or profile me in any way using polls, surveys or quizzes. That’s a missed opportunity, as that kind of zero-party data can power personalization and segmentation during a time in the relationship when there’s little to no first-party data yet.

But the bigger opportunity here is that if you’re only sending a single welcome email, consider testing ways to expand it into a series.

3. Sender Names Could Have Been Better

For some brands, their welcome emails felt like they were sent by a different department or marketing group because of the sender names they used. For example, some brands had senselessly different sender names from the one used for their promotional emails, adding “Inc.,” “Company,” and “USA” to the end of the brand names for only their welcome emails. It made their welcome emails appear unnecessarily corporate and stiff.

That’s not to say that there aren’t opportunities to extend your sender name with purpose. Extending your sender name for your triggered emails, in particular, helps them stand out — not only from your other emails, but from all the other emails in your subscribers’ inboxes. Yet, only two of the brands I received welcome emails from extended their sender name. One used “BrandName Welcome” and the other “BrandName | Welcome.”

If you’re not currently extending your from name for your welcome emails, consider testing it and seeing how much of a lift you get. Adding an extension like “Welcome” is a sensible place to start.

Again, avoid overly corporate-sounding extensions. For example, some other welcome emails I received used sender name formats such as “BrandName Account,” “BrandName Account Services,” and even longer “BrandName Account Member Services.” Another used “BrandName E-mail Subscriptions,” with the dated hyphenation of email. While all of those are descriptive and accurate, they’re not particularly friendly sounding. They seem like they were written by lawyers, not marketers.

4. And There Were Smaller Opportunities to Improve, Too

In addition to those three big areas for improvement, brands sent welcome emails that…

  • Weren’t seasonally relevant. Only one brand seasonally optimized its welcome email, adding in imagery and content to match the season in which I signed up.
  • Rarely used emoji in their subject lines. 😢 Only 13% of brands used emoji in any of their welcome email subject lines. That seems a bit low, given their usage in promotional emails.
  • Included little personalization. Many brands required my name when I signed up, but few used it. For example, only 3% of brands used it in the subject lines of their welcome emails. First-name personalization isn’t great personalization, but if you ask for my name, use it.
  • Had quality control problems. One brand’s welcome email was sent twice, and another’s contained multiple broken images (but thankfully lots of HTML text, too). Not a good look.

Final Thoughts on Welcome Emails

Your welcome email — like all of your automations — are living campaigns. They need regular care and attention.

In fact, this goes double for your welcome emails since they are pivotal to making a good first impression and setting the tone for the emails that follow. If you haven’t reviewed your welcome emails lately, sign up for your email program with fresh eyes and see what improvements you can make or test.

By Chad S. White

Chad S. White is the author of Email Marketing Rules and Head of Research for Oracle Marketing Consulting, a global full-service digital marketing agency inside of Oracle.

Sourced from CMSWire